Texas' 5th Congressional District

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Texas' 5th congressional district
Current incumbentJeb Hensarling Republican Party
Population719,368
Gender50.4% Female, 49.6% Male
Race75.8% White, 13.8% Black, 1.7% Asian
Ethnicity26.4% Hispanic
Unemployment8.4%
Median household income$42,887
High school graduation rate77.8%
College graduation rate18.1%
Texas' 5th Congressional District is located in the northeastern portion of the state and includes Wood, Van Zandt, Kaufman, Dallas, Henderson, Anderson and Cherokee counties.[1]

The district previously included Mesquite plus a number of smaller counties south and east of Dallas including Anderson, Freestone, Henderson and Limestone counties.

The current representative of the 5th congressional district is Jeb Hensarling (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 5th congressional district elections, 2012

The 5th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012 in which incumbent Jeb Hensarling (R) won re-election. He defeated Linda Mrosko (D) and Ken Ashby (L) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Hensarling Incumbent 64.4% 134,091
     Democratic Linda S. Mrosko 33.2% 69,178
     Libertarian Ken Ashby 2.4% 4,961
Total Votes 208,230
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Jeb Hensarling won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Tom Berry (D) and Ken Ashby (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Hensarling incumbent 70.5% 106,742
     Democratic Tom Berry 27.5% 41,649
     Libertarian Ken Ashby 2% 2,958
Total Votes 151,349

2008
On November 4, 2008, Jeb Hensarling won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ken Ashby (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Hensarling incumbent 83.6% 162,894
     Libertarian Ken Ashby 16.4% 31,967
Total Votes 194,861

2006
On November 7, 2006, Jeb Hensarling won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Charlie Thompson (D) and Mike Nelson (L) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Hensarling incumbent 61.8% 88,478
     Democratic Charlie Thompson 35.6% 50,983
     Libertarian Mike Nelson 2.6% 3,791
Total Votes 143,252

2004
On November 2, 2004, Jeb Hensarling won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Bill Bernstein (D) and John Gonzalez (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Hensarling incumbent 64.5% 148,816
     Democratic Bill Bernstein 32.9% 75,911
     Libertarian John Gonzalez 2.7% 6,118
Total Votes 230,845

2002
On November 5, 2002, Jeb Hensarling won election to the United States House. He defeated Ron Chapman (D), Dan Michalski (L) and Thomas Kemper (G) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJeb Hensarling 58.2% 81,439
     Democratic Ron Chapman 40.3% 56,330
     Libertarian Dan Michalski 0.9% 1,283
     Green Thomas Kemper 0.6% 856
Total Votes 139,908

2000
On November 7, 2000, Pete Sessions won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Regina Montoya Coggins (D) and Ken Ashby (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPete Sessions incumbent 54% 100,487
     Democratic Regina Montoya Coggins 44.4% 82,629
     Libertarian Ken Ashby 1.5% 2,842
Total Votes 185,958

1998
On November 3, 1998, Pete Sessions won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Victor Morales (D) and Michael Needleman (L) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPete Sessions incumbent 55.8% 61,714
     Democratic Victor Morales 43.4% 48,073
     Libertarian Michael Needleman 0.8% 880
Total Votes 110,667

1996
On November 5, 1996, Pete Sessions won election to the United States House. He defeated John Pouland (D) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngPete Sessions 53.1% 80,196
     Democratic John Pouland 46.9% 70,922
     N/A Write-in 0% 1
Total Votes 151,119

1994
On November 8, 1994, John Bryant won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Pete Sessions (R), Barbara Morgan (I), Noel Kopala (L) and Reina Arashvand (I) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Bryant incumbent 50.1% 61,877
     Republican Pete Sessions 47.3% 58,521
     Independent Barbara Morgan 1.4% 1,715
     Libertarian Noel Kopala 0.7% 876
     Independent Reina Arashvand 0.5% 627
Total Votes 123,616

1992
On November 3, 1992, John Bryant won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Richard Stokley (R) and William Walker (L) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Bryant incumbent 58.9% 98,567
     Republican Richard Stokley 37.3% 62,419
     Libertarian William Walker 3.8% 6,344
Total Votes 167,330

1990
On November 6, 1990, John Bryant won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Jerry Rucker (R) and Kenneth Ashby (L) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 5 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJohn Bryant incumbent 59.6% 65,228
     Republican Jerry Rucker 37.7% 41,307
     Libertarian Kenneth Ashby 2.7% 2,939
Total Votes 109,474

Redistricting

The 5th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[14]

External links

See also

References

  1. Texas Redistricting Map, "Map," accessed July 24, 2012
  2. Politico "2012 Election Map, Texas"
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. Washington Times "High court to ponder Texas redistricting," Accessed December 14, 2011