Texas' 9th Congressional District

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Texas' 9th congressional district
Current incumbentAl Green Democratic Party
Population691,497
Gender52% Female, 48% Male
Race39.4% White, 38.6% Black, 9.4% Asian
Ethnicity37.2% Hispanic
Unemployment10.7%
Median household income$41,354
High school graduation rate75.4%
College graduation rate22.5%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
Texas' 9th Congressional District is located in the eastern portion of the state and includes part of Harris and Fort Bend counties.[1]

The district previously included much of the northern outlying areas of metro Houston and Beaumont.

The current representative of the 9th congressional district is Al Green (D).

Elections

2012

See also: Texas' 9th congressional district elections, 2012

The 9th congressional district of Texas held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012 in which incumbent Al Green (D) won re-election. He defeated Steve Mueller (R), John Wieder (L) and Vanessa Foster (G) in the general election.[2]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAl Green Incumbent 78.5% 144,075
     Republican Steve Mueller 19.7% 36,139
     Green Vanessa Foster 0.9% 1,743
     Libertarian John Wieder 0.9% 1,609
Total Votes 183,566
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Al Green won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Mueller (R) and Michael Hope (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAl Green incumbent 75.7% 80,107
     Republican Steve Mueller 22.9% 24,201
     Libertarian Michael Hope 1.4% 1,459
Total Votes 105,767

2008
On November 4, 2008, Al Green won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Brad Walters (L) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAl Green incumbent 93.6% 143,868
     Libertarian Brad Walters 6.4% 9,760
Total Votes 153,628

2006
On November 7, 2006, Al Green won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAl Green incumbent 100% 60,253
Total Votes 60,253

2004
On November 2, 2004, Al Green won election to the United States House. He defeated Arlette Molina (R) and Stacey Lynn Bourland (L) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngAl Green 72.2% 114,462
     Republican Arlette Molina 26.6% 42,132
     Libertarian Stacey Lynn Bourland 1.2% 1,972
Total Votes 158,566

2002
On November 5, 2002, Nick Lampson won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Paul Williams (R) and Dean Tucker (L) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngNick Lampson incumbent 58.6% 86,710
     Republican Paul Williams 40.3% 59,635
     Libertarian Dean Tucker 1.1% 1,613
Total Votes 147,958

2000
On November 7, 2000, Nick Lampson won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Paul Williams (R) and F. Charles Knipp (L) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngNick Lampson incumbent 59.2% 130,143
     Republican Paul Williams 39.7% 87,165
     Libertarian F. Charles Knipp 1.1% 2,508
Total Votes 219,816

1998
On November 3, 1998, Nick Lampson won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Tom Cottar (R) in the general election.[9]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 1998
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngNick Lampson incumbent 63.7% 86,055
     Republican Tom Cottar 36.3% 49,107
Total Votes 135,162

1996
On November 5, 1996, Nick Lampson won election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Stockman (R) in the general election.[10]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 1996
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngNick Lampson 52.8% 59,225
     Republican Steve Stockman incumbent 47.2% 52,870
Total Votes 112,095

1994
On November 8, 1994, Steve Stockman won election to the United States House. He defeated Jack Brooks (D), Bill Felton (I) and Darla Beenau (L) in the general election.[11]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 1994
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngSteve Stockman 51.9% 81,353
     Democratic Jack Brooks incumbent 45.7% 71,643
     Independent Bill Felton 1.4% 2,145
     Libertarian Darla Beenau 1.1% 1,656
Total Votes 156,797

1992
On November 3, 1992, Jack Brooks won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Steve Stockman (R) and Billy Joe Crawford (L) in the general election.[12]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 1992
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJack Brooks incumbent 53.6% 118,690
     Republican Steve Stockman 43.5% 96,270
     Libertarian Billy Joe Crawford 2.9% 6,401
Total Votes 221,361

1990
On November 6, 1990, Jack Brooks won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Maury Meyers (R) in the general election.[13]

U.S. House, Texas District 9 General Election, 1990
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngJack Brooks incumbent 57.7% 79,786
     Republican Maury Meyers 42.3% 58,399
Total Votes 138,185

Redistricting

The 9th Congressional District of Texas, prior to the 2010-2011 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Texas

Texas was redistricted in 2011. The controversial map approved by the Texas Legislature and signed by Gov. Rick Perry has been appealed, and the case has been taken up by the U.S. Supreme Court.[14]

External links

See also

References

  1. Texas Redistricting Map "Map" accessed July 24, 2012
  2. ABC News "2012 General Election Results"
  3. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  4. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013
  5. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2006," accessed March 28, 2013
  6. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2004," accessed March 28, 2013
  7. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 2002," accessed March 28, 2013
  8. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 7, 2000," accessed March 28, 2013
  9. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1998," accessed March 28, 2013
  10. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 5, 1996," accessed March 28, 2013
  11. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1994," accessed March 28, 2013
  12. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1992," accessed March 28, 2013
  13. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1990," accessed March 28, 2013
  14. Washington Times "High court to ponder Texas redistricting," Accessed December 14, 2011