Difference between revisions of "Texas Maximum Appropriations Growth Rate Amendment (2011)"

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{{Notx2011}}{{tnr}}The '''Texas Maximum Appropriations Growth Rate''' amendment did not appear on the [[2011 ballot measures|2011 ballot]] as a {{lrcafull}} in the state of [[Texas]].   
 
{{Notx2011}}{{tnr}}The '''Texas Maximum Appropriations Growth Rate''' amendment did not appear on the [[2011 ballot measures|2011 ballot]] as a {{lrcafull}} in the state of [[Texas]].   
  
The proposed ballot measure would have placed a cap on state spending using either (a) Texas's rate of economic growth or (b) population growth plus inflation, as limits. <ref> [http://www.caller.com/news/2011/feb/13/how-we-propose-to-cut-state-government/ ''Caller.com'', "How we propose to cut state government'", February 34, 2011]</ref> Representative [[Ken Paxton]] introduced the proposed measure via HJR 70. <ref name='hjr70'>[http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/82R/billtext/html/HJ00070I.htm Texas House of Representatives, "HJR No. 70"]</ref>
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The proposed ballot measure would have placed a cap on state spending using either (a) Texas's rate of economic growth or (b) population growth plus inflation, as limits.<ref> [http://www.caller.com/news/2011/feb/13/how-we-propose-to-cut-state-government/ ''Caller.com'', "How we propose to cut state government'", February 34, 2011]</ref> Representative [[Ken Paxton]] introduced the proposed measure via HJR 70.<ref name='hjr70'>[http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/tlodocs/82R/billtext/html/HJ00070I.htm Texas House of Representatives, "HJR No. 70"]</ref>
  
 
The 82nd session of the [[Texas State Legislature]] adjourned on May 30, 2011. However, Gov. [[Rick Perry]] called a special session of the [[Texas State Legislature]] that commenced May 31, 2011 in early June and adjourned June 29, 2011. Eight amendments were proposed during the special session, but none passed. Including this proposal.<ref>[http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/Search/TextSearchResults.aspx?CP=1&LegSess=821&House=true&Senate=true&TypeB=true&TypeR=false&TypeJR=true&TypeCR=false&VerInt=true&VerHCR=true&VerEng=true&VerSCR=true&VerEnr=true&DocTypeB=true&DocTypeFN=true&DocTypeBA=true&DocTypeAM=true&Srch=custom&Custom=constitutional+amendment&All=&Any=&Exact=&Exclude= Texas Legislature Bill Lookup, Accessed June 30, 2011]</ref>
 
The 82nd session of the [[Texas State Legislature]] adjourned on May 30, 2011. However, Gov. [[Rick Perry]] called a special session of the [[Texas State Legislature]] that commenced May 31, 2011 in early June and adjourned June 29, 2011. Eight amendments were proposed during the special session, but none passed. Including this proposal.<ref>[http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/Search/TextSearchResults.aspx?CP=1&LegSess=821&House=true&Senate=true&TypeB=true&TypeR=false&TypeJR=true&TypeCR=false&VerInt=true&VerHCR=true&VerEng=true&VerSCR=true&VerEnr=true&DocTypeB=true&DocTypeFN=true&DocTypeBA=true&DocTypeAM=true&Srch=custom&Custom=constitutional+amendment&All=&Any=&Exact=&Exclude= Texas Legislature Bill Lookup, Accessed June 30, 2011]</ref>

Revision as of 22:03, 10 March 2014

Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
will not appear on a ballot
The Texas Maximum Appropriations Growth Rate amendment did not appear on the 2011 ballot as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment in the state of Texas.

The proposed ballot measure would have placed a cap on state spending using either (a) Texas's rate of economic growth or (b) population growth plus inflation, as limits.[1] Representative Ken Paxton introduced the proposed measure via HJR 70.[2]

The 82nd session of the Texas State Legislature adjourned on May 30, 2011. However, Gov. Rick Perry called a special session of the Texas State Legislature that commenced May 31, 2011 in early June and adjourned June 29, 2011. Eight amendments were proposed during the special session, but none passed. Including this proposal.[3]

Text of measure

Ballot title

The proposed ballot summary Texas voters would have seen on their ballot was: ""The constitutional amendment regarding the maximum rate of growth of appropriations and the use of unencumbered surplus general revenues to fund the state's rainy day fund and a public school property tax relief fund.""[2]

Constitutional changes

See also: Amending the Texas Constitution

If the "Maximum Appropriations Growth Rate" amendment made it onto the ballot and was approved by a simple majority of Texas voters in the November 8, 2011 general election, it would have amended Article 17, Section 22, of the Texas Constitution:[2]

(a) The rate of growth of appropriations from the state treasury for a fiscal biennium, as compared to the previous fiscal biennium, from all available sources of revenue except the federal government may not exceed the maximum [the estimated] rate of growth determined in accordance with Subsection (c) of this section and general law. The amount of appropriations from the state treasury for a fiscal biennium may not exceed the amount of permissible appropriations from all available sources of revenue except the federal government for that fiscal biennium, as determined in accordance with Subsection (d) of this section and general law.

(b) For purposes of this section, appropriations from any source of revenue made for the sole purpose of reducing the imposition of ad valorem taxes by a political subdivision of this state or otherwise providing ad valorem tax relief are excluded from the determinations made under Subsections (c) and (d) of this section.
(c) The maximum rate of growth of appropriations from all available sources of revenue except the federal government is the least of:

(1) a rate equal to the sum of:
(A) the estimated rate of growth of this state's population; and
(B) the estimated rate of monetary inflation in this state;
(2) the estimated rate of growth of this state's gross state product; or
(3) the estimated rate of growth of personal income of this state's residents.

(d) The amount of permissible appropriations from all available sources of revenue except the federal government may not exceed an amount determined by multiplying the amount of appropriations from all available sources of revenue except the federal government for the then current fiscal biennium by the sum of one plus the maximum rate of growth determined under Subsection (c) of this section. If the maximum rate of growth determined under Subsection (c) of this section is a negative rate, the maximum amount of permissible appropriations from all available sources of revenue except the federal government for the next fiscal biennium is an amount less than the amount of appropriations for the then current fiscal biennium reduced in accordance with that negative growth rate.

Path to the ballot

See also: Laws governing direct democracy in Texas

As laid out in Article 17 of the Texas Constitution, in order for a proposed constitutional amendment to be placed on the ballot, the Texas State Legislature must propose the amendment in a joint resolution of both the Texas State Senate and the Texas House of Representatives. The joint resolution can originate in either the House or the Senate. The resolution must be adopted by a vote of at least two-thirds of the membership of each house of the legislature. That amounts to a minimum of 100 votes in the House of Representatives and 21 votes in the Senate.

See also

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References