Vote button trans.png
April's Project of the Month
It's spring time. It's primary election season!
Click here to find all the information you'll need to cast your ballot.




Difference between revisions of "The Ballotpedia News Update"

From Ballotpedia
Jump to: navigation, search
m
Line 18: Line 18:
  
 
=January 2014=
 
=January 2014=
 +
<DPL>
 +
category = January 2014
 +
noresultsheader = No news has been posted yet for this month.
 +
order = descending
 +
ordermethod            = firstedit
 +
addeditdate            = true
 +
userdateformat        = M d, Y
 +
format                = ,\n*[[%PAGE%]]&#44;&nbsp;<small>''%DATE%''</small>
 +
</dpl>
 +
 +
=2014=
 +
==January 2014==
 
<DPL>
 
<DPL>
 
category = January 2014
 
category = January 2014

Revision as of 14:00, 27 January 2014

Ballotpedia News



News headlines

News about: elections, politicians and candidates at all levels of government: elections, congress, state executive officials, state legislatures, recall elections, ballot measures and school boards. You can find a full list of projects here.

[edit]



Legislative Lowdown: Identifying competitive South Carolina elections in 2014

Seal of South Carolina.jpg
2014 South Carolina Legislative Lowdown

Table of Contents
Majority control
Margin of victory
Competitiveness

Other 2014 Election coverage
Ballot measuresState executive officialsSchool boards
State legislaturesU.S. HouseU.S. Senate

By Ballotpedia's State legislative team

March 30 was the signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run for South Carolina House of Representatives. Elections in all 124 House districts will consist of a primary election on June 10, 2014, and a general election on November 4, 2014. The South Carolina State Senate will not hold elections this year.

Looking at the current partisan breakdown in the South Carolina House, because there will be very few actual general elections, the election should be unremarkable. Two races in particular should be interesting to watch, as the seats were won by a margin of victory of less than 5 percent in 2012. The primaries may prove more eventful, featuring seven challengers from 2012 seeking office again, one challenger from 2010 and Curtis Brantley (D), the former District 122 incumbent who was defeated in the 2012 Democratic primary.

See also: 2014's state legislative elections and South Carolina House of Representatives elections, 2014

The Tuesday Count: Illinois 2014 ballot - Double the measures, double the fun

Edited by Brittany Clingen

2 certifications
74 measures for 2014



IL ballot (News)
Marijuana (Quick hits)
Wages (Spotlight)

Illinois 2014 ballot measures
Illinoisans will have at least two measures to cast votes on come November, which is twice the average number over the past five years. The approval of two legislatively-referred constitutional amendments - one addressing the right to vote and the other the rights of crime victims - are the first measures on what could be a crowded ballot, by Illinois' standards. Since 2008, only one measure has appeared on the ballot per even-numbered election year; there have been no measures featured on odd-year ballots. If approved by voters, the Right to Vote Amendment would provide that no person shall be denied the right to register to vote or cast a ballot in an election based on race, color, ethnicity, language, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation or income.[1] Proponents and opponents have suggested that the amendment is meant, in part, to discourage a voter identification card law.[2] House Speaker Michael J. Madigan (D-22), who was the amendment's primary sponsor during its time in the legislature, said, "The purpose of the amendment is to ensure that all citizens have an opportunity to register and vote and to prevent the passage of inappropriate voter-suppression laws and discriminatory voting procedures."[3] The measure has garnered some bipartisan support, with House Minority Leader Jim Durkin (R-82) calling on Republicans to support the amendment. He said, "[The state party] had an identity crisis for many years now. Republicans, we're going to win with addition. We need to dispel some of the notions that have been hanging over the GOP for years, that we're a party of white suburban men. For me this was an easy decision."[4]

The second certified amendment, if approved by voters, would strengthen the part of the Illinois Constitution known as the Crime Victims' Bill of Rights. Specifically, the amendment would guarantee a victim’s right to be free from harassment, intimidation and abuse throughout the criminal trial process; a victim’s right to notice and to a hearing before a court ruling on access to any of the victim’s records, information or communications; a victim’s right to be heard at any post-arraignment court proceeding in which a victim’s right is at issue and at any court proceeding involving a post-arraignment release decision, plea or sentencing; a consideration of the safety of the victim and their family in determining bail and conditions of release after arrest and conviction of the defendant; and that the accused does not have standing to assert the rights of a victim.[1] This measure also boasts supporters from both sides of the political aisle.[5]

Tuesday Count-Checkmark.png
Join Our Mailing List
Email:
For Email Marketing you can trust

Donate.png

Two other measures that have the potential to appear on the ballot in November will likely be significantly more divisive if supporters can gather enough signatures by the May 5, 2014, deadline to put them before voters. The Illinois Independent Redistricting Amendment, also known as the "Yes for Independent Maps" campaign, would create an independent, nonpartisan commission, consisting of eleven members, for the purpose of redrawing district lines for the Illinois General Assembly.[6] The measure is sponsored by Yes for Independent Maps.[7] The amendment would also create a process for selecting members of the commission that is open to application by any Illinois citizen.[1] Redistricting has long been a contentious issue in Illinois. Following the 2010 U.S. Census, Illinois faced the responsibility of redrawing legislative district lines in accordance with the state constitution. At that time, several proposals were put forth by the legislature as legislatively-referred constitutional amendments and one by the group Illinois Fair Map Amendment Coalition as an initiated constitutional amendment. Ultimately, none of the proposed constitutional amendments made it to the ballot that year. In 2011, Gov. Pat Quinn (D) signed the controversial Illinois Voting Rights Act of 2011, which required that legislative districts be redrawn to ensure people of "racial and language minorities" were given the opportunity to elect their preferred candidates. Because both the state legislature and the governor's office were controlled by Democrats at that time, many argued that the new redistricting procedures served to protect the Democratic majority and keep incumbents in office.[8]

The second initiated constitutional amendment that will almost certainly stir Illinois' already sticky political pot is the Illinois Term Limits for Legislators Amendment, which is being sponsored by Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner. The measure would establish eight-year term limits for legislators, reduce the size of the Senate from 59 to 41, increase the size of the House from 118 to 123 and require a two-thirds majority vote in both houses for the legislature to override a governor’s veto.[9] According to Rauner, "Out-of-control spending, record tax hikes, terrible unemployment and a state government controlled by special interests – the career politicians are failing Illinois."[10] Supporters of both initiated amendments must collect at least 298,399 valid signatures to land their measures on the November ballot.

2014 Count
Number: 74 measures
States: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming

Filing deadline report: Governor Fallin challenged in Oklahoma

Oklahoma

By Garrett Fortin

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: Nine state executive positions are up for election in 2014 in the state of Oklahoma: governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, treasurer, state auditor and inspector and superintendent of public instruction, commissioner of insurance, commissioner of labor and one seat on the corporation commission

The primary election is scheduled for June 24, 2014. Oklahoma has a mixed primary system, in which parties decide who may vote, so an unaffiliated voter must be authorized by a party in order to vote in the primary.[11]

One incumbent, Corporation Commissioner Patrice Douglas, is running for Congress. The other eight incumbents are running for re-election. They are:

On Friday, April 11, the filing period came to a close. The following list of candidates is current as of April 14, 2014.

A total of 25 candidates filed for the 9 offices - 15 Republicans, 7 Democrats and 3 Independents.

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Attorney General

Superintendent

Auditor

Treasurer

Insurance Commissioner

Labor Commissioner

Corporation Commission


State Legislative Tracker: Recall petition filed against Arizona legislator

Edited by Joel Williams
This week’s tracker includes a look at the recall attempt against an Arizona lawmaker.


Legislative Lowdown: Identifying competitive Utah elections in 2014

Seal of Utah.svg.png
2014 Utah Legislative Lowdown

Table of Contents
Majority control
Margin of victory
Competitiveness

Other 2014 Election coverage
Ballot measuresState executive officialsSchool boards
State legislaturesU.S. HouseU.S. Senate

By Ballotpedia's State legislative team

Although neither chamber is in consideration to potentially flip in the coming election, several races feature former legislators running to return to the legislature. Former Senator Ross Romero (D) is running for the seat of the retiring Patricia Jones (D). Casey Anderson (R), an incumbent who lost in the 2012 Republican convention to Evan Vickers (R), will get a re-match in this year’s convention. Although he lost to Janice Fisher (D) in 2012 after the two were drawn together, former Representative Fred Cox (R) will run for Fisher’s seat following her retirement. Former Representative Holly Richardson (R) is challenging incumbent Brian Greene (R), while Jerry Anderson (R) will face the challenge of two former legislators, Christine Watkins (R) and Bill Labrum (R).

March 20 was the signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run for Utah State Senate and Utah House of Representatives. Elections in 14 Senate districts and all 75 House districts will consist of a primary election on June 24, 2014, and a general election on November 4, 2014.

See also: 2014's state legislative elections; Utah State Senate elections and Utah House of Representatives elections



January 2014


2014


2013


2012


2011


2010


2014


2013


2012


2011


2014


2013


2012


2011



2014


2013


2012


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Illinois General Assembly, "Constitutional Amendment 52," accessed April 11, 2014
  2. Crain's Chicago Business, "Right-to-vote amendment to go on Illinois ballot," April 10, 2014
  3. The State Journal-Register, "Voter rights amendment passes Illinois House," April 8, 2014
  4. Seattle Post-Intelligencer, "Durkin: Voter rights effort helps rebuild GOP," April 8, 2014
  5. Illinois Legislature, "Bill Status of HJRCA0001," accessed April 11, 2014
  6. PRNewswire, "CHANGE Illinois! Launches Statewide Redistricting Ballot Initiative," May 15, 2013
  7. Yes for independent maps website, accessed March 5, 2014
  8. Huffington Post Chicago (blog), "Illinois Redistricting: Democrat-Backed Maps Head to Quinn's Desk, Threaten Republican Gains," May 31, 2011
  9. The State Journal-Register, "Illinois term limit supporters halfway to 2014 ballot," November 21, 2013
  10. BruceRauner.com, "8 Years and Out," accessed April 15, 2014
  11. Oklahoma State Election Board Website, "Voter Registration in Oklahoma," accessed January 3, 2014
  12. Oklahomans for Ballot Access Reform, "Governor Mary Fallin Has Made Moves Toward A Re-election Bid; Who Will Oppose Her?," July 10, 2013
  13. Tulsa World, "Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin kicks off re-election campaign," October 18, 2013
  14. 14.00 14.01 14.02 14.03 14.04 14.05 14.06 14.07 14.08 14.09 14.10 Oklahoma State Election Board, "Candidates for Federal, State, Legislative and Judicial Offices," April 14, 2014
  15. KFOR, "Rep. Joe Dorman to explore run for governor," December 17, 2013
  16. Oklahomans For Ballot Access Reform, "Richard Prawdzienski Announces Independent Bid For Governor’s Seat," February 25, 2014
  17. The Oklahoman, "Slow election year shaping up for 2014 in Oklahoma," August 8, 2013
  18. DemoOkie, "Cathy Cummings to run for Lieutenant Governor with a video," December 2, 2012
  19. Tulsa World, "Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to seek re-election," July 29, 2013
  20. Tulsa World, "State Board of Education member resigns, considers run for state superintendent," April 24, 2013
  21. The Ada News, "Hofmeister announces candidacy for state school superintendent," June 5, 2013
  22. News on 6, Jack Herron to seek Oklahoma superintendent's job, October 16, 2013
  23. Grand Lake News, "Holmes enters State School Superintendent race," October 23, 2013
  24. The Ada News, "Cox: ‘Cookie-cutter’ approach doesn’t work in education," August 8, 2013
  25. News9, "Long-Time OK Educator Announces Candidacy For State Superintendent," October 21, 2013
  26. Facebook, "Workman for Oklahoma Labor Commissioner," accessed August 29, 2013
  27. Tulsa World, "Todd Hiett announces bid for corporation commission," February 25, 2014
  28. Tulsa World, "State Sen. Cliff Branan to run for Oklahoma Corporation Commission," February 25, 2014