Difference between revisions of "U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs"

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==Issues==
 
==Issues==
 
===VA hospital waiting lines===
 
===VA hospital waiting lines===
According to reports by ''CNN'', veterans hospitals across the country were delaying care of veteran patients, at times to the point that some veterans conditions deteriorated vastly or died due to the wait times. To cover for the long delays, some hospitals resorted to "secret lists" for patients awaiting care in order to keep their official wait times down. The following reports were released by ''CNN''.<ref name="secretlist">[http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/23/health/veterans-dying-health-care-delays/index.html ''CNN'', "A fatal wait: Veterans languish and die on a VA hospital's secret list," April 24, 2014]</ref>
+
According to reports by ''CNN'', veterans hospitals across the country were delaying care of veteran patients, at times to the point that some veterans conditions deteriorated vastly or died due to the wait times. To cover for the long delays, some hospitals resorted to "secret lists" for patients awaiting care in order to keep their official wait times down. The following reports were released by ''CNN'':<ref name="secretlist">[http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/23/health/veterans-dying-health-care-delays/index.html ''CNN'', "A fatal wait: Veterans languish and die on a VA hospital's secret list," April 24, 2014]</ref>
 
*On November 20, 2013, it was reported that at Williams Jennings Bryan Dorn Veterans Medical Center in Columbia, [[South Carolina]], patients were not receiving routine gastrointestinal procedures until up to a year after requesting an appointment, at times even longer. A review of 280 gastrointestinal patients showed that 52 of the patients showed complications due to the delay in care and early detection. The VA confirmed six deaths resulted from delayed care at the hospital, but ''CNN'''s sources suggested the number could be as high as 20.<ref name="dorn">[http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/19/health/veterans-dying-health-care-delays/index.html ''CNN'', "Hospital delays are killing America's war veterans," November 20, 2013]</ref>
 
*On November 20, 2013, it was reported that at Williams Jennings Bryan Dorn Veterans Medical Center in Columbia, [[South Carolina]], patients were not receiving routine gastrointestinal procedures until up to a year after requesting an appointment, at times even longer. A review of 280 gastrointestinal patients showed that 52 of the patients showed complications due to the delay in care and early detection. The VA confirmed six deaths resulted from delayed care at the hospital, but ''CNN'''s sources suggested the number could be as high as 20.<ref name="dorn">[http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/19/health/veterans-dying-health-care-delays/index.html ''CNN'', "Hospital delays are killing America's war veterans," November 20, 2013]</ref>
 
:The Dorn hospital also received an addition $1 million in federal funding in 2011 in order to treat the patients on long waiting lists. However, according to documents, only one-third of the the federal funds went to the intended destination. <ref name="dorn"/>
 
:The Dorn hospital also received an addition $1 million in federal funding in 2011 in order to treat the patients on long waiting lists. However, according to documents, only one-third of the the federal funds went to the intended destination. <ref name="dorn"/>

Revision as of 09:23, 2 May 2014

Department of Veterans Affairs
US-DeptOfVeteransAffairs-Seal.svg
Secretary:Eric Shinseki
Deputy Secretary:Vacant
Annual budget:138.5 billion (2013)
Total employed:295,742 (2011)
Year created:1989
Official website:http://www.va.gov/

FederalAffairsLogo-01.png

Executive Departments of the United States

Executive Departments
Department of DefenseDepartment of StateDepartment of Homeland SecurityDepartment of JusticeDepartment of CommerceDepartment of EducationDepartment of the TreasuryDepartment of AgricultureDepartment of EnergyDepartment of LaborDepartment of TransportationDepartment of the InteriorDepartment of Health and Human ServicesDepartment of Veterans AffairsDepartment of Housing and Urban Development

Department Secretaries
Chuck HagelJohn KerryJeh JohnsonEric HolderPenny PritzkerArne DuncanJack LewTom VilsackErnest MonizTom PerezAnthony FoxxSally JewellSylvia Mathews BurwellRobert McDonaldJulian Castro
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a United States executive department formed in 1989 to, in President Lincoln's words, "care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan."[1] The Department stems from the Veterans Administration formed in 1930.[2] The current Secretary of Veterans Affairs is Eric Shinseki, who was confirmed by the Senate on January 20, 2009.[3]

The Department of Veterans Affairs employed 295,742 people in 2011.[4] Among the agencies overseen by the Department are the National Cemetery Administration, the Veterans Benefits Administration and the Veterans Health Administration.[5]

History

The 1776 Continental Congress recruited soldiers by promising pensions to those who were disabled during their term of duty. In 1881, the first federal medical facility for veterans was established. Prior to the formation of the facility, states and communities were responsible for the care of veterans. More government-run facilities and homes were established after the Civil War. Benefits increased when the U.S. entered World War I, including, "disability compensation, insurance for service persons and veterans, and vocational rehabilitation for the disabled." With increased benefits and agencies disbursing the benefits, the Veterans Administration was established in 1930, bringing all the agencies together. Frank T. Hines was the first Administrator of Veterans Affairs, leading the organization until 1945. The GI Bill was passed in 1944 as the first educational assistance to military personnel.[2]

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was officially established as a cabinet-level department on March 15, 1989, by President George H.W. Bush.[2]

Structure

Mission

The official Department mission statement is as follows:

To fulfill President Lincoln's promise "To care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan" by serving and honoring the men and women who are America's veterans.[1][6]

Leadership

Eric Shinseki currently holds the position of Secretary of Veterans Affairs.

Note: Votes marked "N/A" represent voice votes or unrecorded votes. Missing votes will be filled as they are researched.

Organizational chart

DOVA org chart.jpg

Issues

VA hospital waiting lines

According to reports by CNN, veterans hospitals across the country were delaying care of veteran patients, at times to the point that some veterans conditions deteriorated vastly or died due to the wait times. To cover for the long delays, some hospitals resorted to "secret lists" for patients awaiting care in order to keep their official wait times down. The following reports were released by CNN:[7]

  • On November 20, 2013, it was reported that at Williams Jennings Bryan Dorn Veterans Medical Center in Columbia, South Carolina, patients were not receiving routine gastrointestinal procedures until up to a year after requesting an appointment, at times even longer. A review of 280 gastrointestinal patients showed that 52 of the patients showed complications due to the delay in care and early detection. The VA confirmed six deaths resulted from delayed care at the hospital, but CNN's sources suggested the number could be as high as 20.[8]
The Dorn hospital also received an addition $1 million in federal funding in 2011 in order to treat the patients on long waiting lists. However, according to documents, only one-third of the the federal funds went to the intended destination. [8]
  • The Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center in Augusta, Georgia, experienced the deaths of three patients due to long delays in treatment and had a waiting list of over 4,500 patients.[8]
  • Between 2010 and 2011, VA internal documents indicated 82 veterans died or were dying in part due to delayed care from VA hospitals in the United States.[9]
  • The Phoenix Veterans Affairs Health Care system in Phoenix, Arizona, at least 40 veterans died waiting for care. The VA system in Phoenix used a secret waiting list. The secret list was used as a placeholder for patients whose care would be delayed for months. VA guidelines require care be given in a timely manner, usually within three weeks, but the Phoenix system used the secret list to hold names between the times appointments were made until the appointment could be made within the required VA timeline.[7]

Members of the House Veterans Affairs Committee began investigating the VA hospital delays in November 2013.[8] In April 2014, Rep. Jeff Miller ordered all records be preserved and intended to make the issue a congressional investigation.[7]

Despite the delays in care in facilities across the United States, many hospital and regional directors received bonuses worth between $7,500 to $80,000.[10]

Analysis

Budget

The requested budget for the 2013 fiscal year is $138.5 billion, 9.2% higher than the 2012 budget of $126.8 billion.[11]

Employment

The Best Places to work in the Federal Government is a website that tracks workforce trends in federal agencies. According to their analysis, from 2008-2012, the Department of Veterans Affairs has added an average of 6,147 jobs per year.[12]

Sequester

The budget of the Department of Veterans Affairs was not impacted by the sequestration.[13]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term U.S. + Department + Veterans + Affairs

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

VA News Feed

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External links

References