Difference between revisions of "United States Congress"

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==The current House of Representatives==
 
==The current House of Representatives==
 
The following is a simple list of the current members of the U.S. Representatives broken down by state.
 
The following is a simple list of the current members of the U.S. Representatives broken down by state.
===Alabama===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Alabama}}
 
 
===Alaska===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Alaska}}
 
 
===Arizona===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Arizona}}
 
 
===Arkansas===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Arkansas}}
 
 
===California===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=California}}
 
 
===Colorado===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Colorado}}
 
 
===Connecticut===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Connecticut}}
 
 
===Delaware===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Delaware}}
 
 
===Florida===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Florida}}
 
 
===Georgia===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Georgia}}
 
 
===Hawaii===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Hawaii}}
 
 
===Idaho===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Idaho}}
 
 
===Illinois===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Illinois}}
 
 
===Indiana===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Indiana}}
 
 
===Iowa===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Iowa}}
 
 
===Kansas===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Kansas}}
 
 
===Kentucky===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Kentucky}}
 
 
===Louisiana===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Louisiana}}
 
 
===Maine===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Maine}}
 
 
===Maryland===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Maryland}}
 
 
===Massachusetts===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Massachusetts}}
 
 
===Michigan===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Michigan}}
 
 
===Minnesota===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Minnesota}}
 
 
===Mississippi===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Mississippi}}
 
 
===Missouri===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Missouri}}
 
 
===Montana===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Montana}
 
 
===Nebraska===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Nebraska}}
 
 
===Nevada===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Nevada}}
 
 
===New Hampshire===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=New Hampshire}}
 
 
===New Jersey===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=New Jersey}}
 
 
===New Mexico===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=New Mexico}}
 
 
===New York===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=New York}}
 
 
===North Carolina===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=North Carolina}}
 
 
===North Dakota===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=North Dakota}}
 
 
===Ohio===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Ohio}}
 
 
===Oklahoma===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Oklahoma}}
 
 
===Oregon===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Oregon}}
 
 
===Pennsylvania===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Pennsylvania}}
 
 
===Rhode Island===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Rhode Island}}
 
 
===South Carolina===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=South Carolina}}
 
 
===South Dakota===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=South Dakota}}
 
 
===Tennessee===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Tennessee}}
 
 
===Texas===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Texas}}
 
 
===Utah===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Utah}}
 
 
===Vermont===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Vermont}}
 
 
===Virginia===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Virginia}}
 
 
===Washington===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Washington}}
 
 
===West Virginia===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=West Virginia}}
 
 
===Wisconsin===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Wisconsin}}
 
 
===Wyoming===
 
{{Congdelegationlists|Chamber=House|State=Wyoming}}
 
 
 
  
 
=Recent news=
 
=Recent news=

Revision as of 12:26, 23 April 2014

[edit]

General overview

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the United States of America federal government. It consists of two houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives, with members chosen through direct election. It meets in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C..

Senate

See also: United States Senate

The Senate is the upper house of Congress. Each U.S state is represented by two senators, regardless of population. This ensures equal representation of each state in the Senate. U.S. Senators serve staggered six-year terms.

According to the U.S. Constitution, Senators must meet the following requirements:

  • Be at least 30 years old
  • Be a U.S. citizen for at least nine years
  • Be a resident of the state he or she represents

House of Representatives

See also: United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives, commonly referred to as "the House," is the lower house of Congress. Each state receives representation in the House in proportion to its population, but is entitled to at least one Representative. The total number of voting representatives is currently fixed at 435. There are also five delegates and one resident commissioner, who do not have full voting rights. House representatives serve two-year terms.[1]

According to the U.S. Constitution, Representatives must meet the following requirements:

  • Be at least 25 years old
  • Be a U.S. citizen for at least seven years
  • Be a resident of the state he or she represents

Word meaning

The term congress not only refers to the collective legislative body, but also to a specific two-year period. For example, the congress for the years 2011-2012 is also called the 112th U.S. Congress.[2][3]

U.S. Constitution

All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.[4]

United States Constitution, Article 1, Section 1

The formation and powers of congress are laid out in ten sections of Article I of the United States Constitution:

  • Section 1: Gives all legislative powers to Congress
  • Section 2: Defines the basic formation of the House of Representatives and the qualifications for its members
  • Section 3: Defines the basic formation of the Senate and the qualifications for its members
  • Section 4: Defines how elections are held
  • Section 5: Defines how legislative meetings should be conducted
  • Section 6: Gives compensation for services to members, provides certain freedoms from arrest during sessions, limits membership in other civil offices
  • Section 7: Defines how bills originate and become law
  • Section 8: Lists specific powers granted to congress
  • Section 9: Provides limits to certain powers
  • Section 10: Limits certain powers of the states

Current leadership and partisan balance

Leadership

Partisan balance

Senate Partisan Balance
Party As of July 2014
Democratic 53
Republican 45
Independent 2
Total 100
House Partisan Balance
Party As of July 2014
Democratic 199
Republican 233
Vacancies 3
Total 435

Elections

2014

See also: United States Congress elections, 2014

A total of 471 seats will be up for election on November 4, 2014.

U.S. House

See also: United States House of Representatives elections, 2014 and U.S. House battleground districts, 2014

All 435 seats of the U.S. House are up for election in 2014. To regain control of the House, Democrats would need a pick-up of 15 seats. According to original analysis by Ballotpedia, only 27 congressional districts will be truly competitive in 2014.

U.S. Senate

See also: United States Senate elections, 2014

The 33 Class II U.S. Senate seats are up for election. Of those 33 seats, 20 are currently held by Democrats and 13 by Republican senators. Additionally, three special elections will take place in 2014 to fill vacancies that occurred during the 113th Congress (Hawaii, Oklahoma and South Carolina). All three of these special elections will also take place on November 4, 2014, for a total of 36 Senate elections.

2012

See also: United States Congress elections, 2012

A total of 468 seats in the U.S. Congress were up for election on November 6, 2012.

U.S. House

In a year where Barack Obama won re-election by 126 electoral votes, the Republican party maintained their control of the U.S. House winning 234 seats. The Democrats did make some gains, winning 201 seats. This is up from the 193 seats they held prior to the election.[5] This election marks only the fourth time in 100 years that the party that pulled the most total popular votes nationwide did not win control of the House.[6]

U.S. Senate

The Democratic Party retained control over the chamber, winning 25 of the 33 seats. With Republican candidates winning only eight seats, this was the worst performance by a major party since the 1950s.[5]

See also

External links

The current U.S. Senate

The following is a simple list of the current members of the U.S. Senate broken down by state.

The current House of Representatives

The following is a simple list of the current members of the U.S. Representatives broken down by state.

2014 news


2013 news


2012 news


Portal:Congress

References