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United States Congress

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Revision as of 11:54, 31 May 2012 by BaileyL (Talk | contribs)

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The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States of America, consisting of two houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives. Both senators and representatives are chosen through direct election.

Each of the 435 members of the House of Representatives represents a district and serves a two-year term. House seats are apportioned among the states by population. The 100 Senators serve staggered six-year terms. Each state has two senators, regardless of population. Every two years, approximately one-third of the Senate is elected.

Article I of the Constitution vests all legislative power in the Congress. The House and Senate are equal partners in the legislative process (legislation cannot be enacted without the consent of both chambers); however, the Constitution grants each chamber some unique powers. The Senate is uniquely empowered to ratify treaties and to approve top presidential appointments. Revenue-raising bills must originate in the House of Representatives, which also has the sole power of impeachment, while the Senate has the sole power to try impeachment cases.

The Congress meets in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

The term Congress is also used to refer to a particular meeting of the national legislature, reckoned according to the terms of representatives. Therefore, a "Congress" covers two years.

Portions of this article were adapted from Wikipedia.

Elections

2012

See also: U.S. Congress elections, 2012

A total of 468 seats in the U.S. Congress will be up for election on November 6, 2012.

External links

U.S. Senate website
U.S. House of Representatives website
U.S. Senator contact information
THOMAS Text archive of all congressional legislation.

References

Wikipedia, United States Congress