Difference between revisions of "United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs"

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*[[Susan M. Collins]] (ME) ''Ranking Member''
 
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*[[Tom Coburn]] (OK)

Revision as of 03:02, 26 January 2012

The United States House of Representatives Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs is a standing committee of the U.S. Senate. While elements of the Committee can be traced back into the 19th century, its modern origins began with the creation of the Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments on April 18, 1921. Its inaugural committee was chaired by Medill McCormick.[1]

Leadership

The committee chair in the 112th Congress is Joe Lieberman (D).

Membership

2011-2012 (112th Congress)

Democratic Party Democrats (9)

Republican Party Republicans (8)

Subcommittees

Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations
Jurisdiction: Studying or investigating the efficiency and economy of operations of all branches of the Government; studying or investigating the compliance or noncompliance of corporations, companies, or individual or other entities with the rules, regulations, and laws governing the various governmental agencies and their relationships with the public, determining whether any changes are required in the laws of the United States in order to protect public interests against the occurrence of improper practices or activities by labor or management groups, studying or investigating syndicated or organized crime which may operate in or otherwise utilize the facilities of interstate and international commerce, studying or investigating all other aspects of crime and lawlessness within the United States which have an impact upon or affect the national health, welfare, and safety including but not limited to investment fraud schemes, commodity and security fraud, computer fraud, and the use of offshore banking and corporate facilities to carry out criminal objectives, studying or investigating the effectiveness of present national security methods, and studying or investigating the efficiency, economy and effectiveness of all agencies and departments of the Government involved in the control and management of energy shortages.[2]

Oversight of Government Management, the Federal Workforce and the District of Columbia (OGM)
Jurisdiction: The Federal Civil Service, authorizing matters related to the District of Columbia, studying the effectiveness of national security staffing, studying the intergovernmental relationships between the United States and the States and municipalities, and between the United States and international organizations of which the United States is a member, and studying the management, efficiency, effectiveness and economy of all agencies and departments of the Federal government, including the Management Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security.[2]

Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security (FFM)
Jurisdiction: The effectiveness and efficiency of Federal financial management, budget and accounting measures, other than appropriations, except as provided in the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, government information, including management of information technology, Archives of the United States, Census and collection of statistics, including economic and social statistics, The United States Postal Service, studying the effectiveness of present national security methods and nuclear proliferation, organization and management of United States nuclear export policy, and studying relations with oil producing and consuming countries with respect to government involvement in the control and management of energy shortages.[2]

Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery and Intergovernmental Affairs (DRIA)
Jurisdiction: Oversight of activities of the Department of Homeland Security related to supporting state and local fusion centers including training and technical assistance, activities of the Department of Homeland Security related to the Office of the Private Sector and the integration of the private sector into the nation’s emergency preparedness, resiliency, and response initiatives, activities of the Department of Homeland Security related to community preparedness and onsite training and technical assistance programs, activities of the Department of Homeland Security concerning the establishment and expansion of homeland security education and outreach programs at the primary, secondary, post-secondary, and graduate levels, activities of the Department of Homeland Security related to disaster recovery, including the recovery provisions of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act and coordination of recovery planning and activities among federal agencies, state and local governments, nongovernmental organizations and the private sector, the efficiency, economy and effectiveness of the Department of Homeland Security’s post disaster financial assistance programs under the Stafford Act, activities of the Department of Homeland Security related to the Office of Counternarcotics Enforcement, and cooperation between DHS and state and local law enforcement on counternarcotics issues.[2]

Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight
Jurisdiction: Oversight of the implementation of federal statutes and regulations related to procurement, including the Federal Acquisition Regulation, oversight of agency policies and procedures related to federal contracting and management of contracting, and oversight of the acquisition functions of the General Services Administration and the Office of Federal Procurement Policy.[2]

Jurisdiction

According to the official Senate website, the jurisdiction of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee includes the following:

  1. government operations generally and the Department of Homeland Security in particular.
  2. study the efficiency, economy, and effectiveness of all agencies and departments of the federal government.
  3. evaluate the effects of laws enacted to reorganize the legislative and executive branches of government.
  4. study the intergovernmental relationships between the U.S. and states and municipalities, and between the U.S. and international organizations of which the U.S. is a member.
  5. homeland security issues.
  6. oversees and receives legislation, messages, petitions, and memorials on all matters relating to the Department of Homeland Security, except for appropriations, the Coast Guard, the Transportation Security Administration, immigration, customs revenue, commercial operations, and trade.
  7. supervising the Archives of the United States.
  8. budgeting and accounting measures generally.
  9. government contracting.
  10. the Census and collection of statistics.
  11. Congressional organization.
  12. the federal Civil Service.
  13. government information.
  14. intergovernmental relations.
  15. the municipal affairs of the District of Columbia.
  16. the organization and management of U.S. nuclear export policy.
  17. the organization and reorganization of the executive branch.
  18. the Postal Service.
  19. the status of officers and employees of the U.S. including their classification, compensation, and benefits.
  20. receives and examines reports of the Comptroller General of the United States and submits recommendations to the Senate as it sees fit related to the subject matter of the reports.

Contact

340 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510

Phone: (202) 224-2627

See also

External links

References