United States Senate elections, 2014

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2012

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2014 U.S. Senate Elections

Election Date
November 4, 2014

U.S. Senate Elections by State
Alabama • Alaska • Arkansas • Colorado • Delaware • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Montana • Nebraska • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • North Carolina • Oklahoma • Oregon • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Virginia • West Virginia • Wyoming

U.S. House Elections by State
Alabama • Alaska • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • Florida • Georgia • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming

Elections Information
Election DatesVoting in Primaries
Voting on November 4, 2014
Poll Opening and Closing Times
Elections to the U.S. Senate will be held on November 4, 2014. A total of 33 of the 100 seats will be up for regular election. Additionally, there are currently two special elections to fill vacancies that have occurred in the 113th Congress (Hawaii and South Carolina).

Partisan breakdown

The following table displays the 33 seats that are up for election. In 2012, the Democratic Party retained control over the chamber, winning 25 of the 33 seats. With Republican candidates winning only eight seats, this was the worst performance by a major party since the 1950s.[1]

U.S. Senate Partisan Breakdown
Party As of April 2014 After the 2014 Election
     Democratic Party 53 Pending
     Republican Party 45 Pending
     Independent 2 Pending
Total 100 100

Campaign finance

According to an April 2013 Politico report, incumbent Democrats in red states raised "millions" in the first three months of 2013.[2] The candidates highlighted in the article were:

  • Democratic Party Mary Landrieu (LA) had raised $1.2 million and had $3.5 million cash on hand
  • Democratic Party Mark Pryor (AK) had raised $1.9 million and had $3.4 million cash on hand
  • Democratic Party Kay Hagan (NC) had raised $1.6 million and had $2.7 million cash on hand
  • Democratic Party Mark Begich (AK) had raised $948,000 and had $1.5 million cash on hand[2]

Race ratings

New York Times

According to an analysis by Nate Silver of The New York Times, Democrats are looking at a tough road ahead of them in the U.S. Senate in 2014. Democrats hold 21 of the 35 seats up for election in 2014, and there are more Democratic controlled seats that lean Republican than Republican seats that lean Democratic.[3]

Additionally, Democrats could suffer from a lower voter turnout of their base due to the fact that 2014 is a midterm election and President Obama will not be on the ballot.[3]

However, Republicans need to take six seats in order to gain control of the Senate, a large gain that will be difficult to accomplish even in a favorable environment. Based on the data below, at this very early stage Republicans are expected to be able to pick up four or five seats.[3]

The table below lists the initial race ratings overview for the 35 senate seats up for election in 2014 as of February 2013.[3]

The New York Times Race Ratings -- U.S. Senate
Month Solid D Likely D Lean D Tossup Lean R Likely R Solid R
February 20, 2013[4] 6 7 3 4 0 4 11
July 15, 2013[5] 8 4 3 3 0 4 13
March 23, 2014[6] 10 2 3 1 1 4 16

Most vulnerable seats

The FiscalTimes compiled a list of the seven most vulnerable Senate seats up for election in 2014. The seven included in the list are: Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Dakota, and West Virginia. Going into the 2014 election, all seven seats are held by Democrats.[7]

State-by-state breakdown

United States Senate Elections Results in 2014
State Incumbent Incumbent Party Incumbent Running? 2014 Winner Partisan switch?
Alabama Jeff Sessions Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Alaska Mark Begich Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Arkansas Mark Pryor Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Colorado Mark Udall Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Delaware Chris Coons Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Georgia Saxby Chambliss Ends.png Republican No[8] Pending Pending
Idaho Jim Risch Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Illinois Richard Durbin Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Iowa Tom Harkin Electiondot.png Democratic No[9] Pending Pending
Kansas Pat Roberts Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Kentucky Mitch McConnell Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Louisiana Mary Landrieu Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Maine Susan Collins Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Massachusetts Mo Cowan Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Michigan Carl Levin Electiondot.png Democratic No[10] Pending Pending
Minnesota Al Franken Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Mississippi Thad Cochran Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Montana Max Baucus Electiondot.png Democratic No[11] Pending Pending
Nebraska Mike Johanns Ends.png Republican No[12] Pending Pending
New Hampshire Jeanne Shaheen Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
New Jersey Frank Lautenberg Electiondot.png Democratic No[13] Pending Pending
New Mexico Tom Udall Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
North Carolina Kay Hagan Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Oklahoma Jim Inhofe Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Oregon Jeff Merkley Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
Rhode Island Jack Reed Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
South Carolina Lindsey Graham Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
South Dakota Tim Johnson Electiondot.png Democratic No[14] Pending Pending
Tennessee Lamar Alexander Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Texas John Cornyn Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending
Virginia Mark Warner Electiondot.png Democratic Pending Pending Pending
West Virginia Jay Rockefeller Electiondot.png Democratic No[15] Pending Pending
Wyoming Mike Enzi Ends.png Republican Pending Pending Pending

See also

External links

References