Difference between revisions of "User:BaileyL/Elections today sandbox"

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In Virginia, most federal offices have already held their Republican and Democratic conventions to determine the nominee, however, the [[Virginia's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014|1st]], [[Virginia's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014|7th]] and [[Virginia's 8th Congressional District elections, 2014|8th]] Districts will hold party primaries.
 
In Virginia, most federal offices have already held their Republican and Democratic conventions to determine the nominee, however, the [[Virginia's 1st Congressional District elections, 2014|1st]], [[Virginia's 7th Congressional District elections, 2014|7th]] and [[Virginia's 8th Congressional District elections, 2014|8th]] Districts will hold party primaries.
  
Sen. [[Lindsey Graham]] has a handful of challengers for the [[United States Senate|U.S. Senate]] Republican primary, but is expected to secure the nomination.  
+
Sen. [[Lindsey Graham]] has a handful of challengers for the [[United States Senate|U.S. Senate]] Republican primary, but polling has shown him hovering at the necessary 50 percent mark needed to avoid a primary runoff.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/06/10/for-sen-lindsey-graham-50-percent-is-the-only-number-that-matters-today/ ''The Washington Post'', "For Lindsey Graham, 50 percent is the only number that matters today," June 10, 2014]</ref>
 
==Arkansas==
 
==Arkansas==
 
:: ''See also: [[Arkansas elections, 2014]]''
 
:: ''See also: [[Arkansas elections, 2014]]''

Revision as of 08:33, 10 June 2014

Vote button.jpg
July 22, 2014 elections
ConnecticutGeorgia

A 19-candidate mayoral race, charges of misconduct and a contentious governor election make today's otherwise standard primary election day more notable in several states. A total of eight states - Arkansas, Connecticut, Maine, Nevada, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Carolina and Virginia - have primary elections on June 10, 2014, running the gamut from federal to local elections. Arkansas will hold its only state executive primary runoff election today to choose the Republican candidate for Arkansas Attorney General. Nevada has the highest number of contested state executive primary elections for June 10, including a large field for governor. Incumbent Brian Sandoval faces four Republican challengers, while nine Democratic candidates battle for their spot in the general election.[1] Meanwhile, in Reno, Nevada, an astounding 19 candidates will appear on the ballot in the mayoral election. If no one candidate receives more than 50 percent of the vote - a feasible outcome given the litany of options - a runoff election will take place on November 4, 2014. The current incumbent, Bob Cashell, is ineligible to run due to term limits.

School board candidate Joe Spencer's charges of misconduct and misuse of district resources against incumbent Erin E. Cranor preceded his electoral challenge for her District G seat in Clark County, Nevada.[2]

Voters in North Dakota will decide whether to restrict its century-old tradition of initiative and referendum. If approved by the majority of the electorate, Measure 1 would change the filing deadline for initiated petitions from 90 to 120 days before a statewide election and mandate that challenges to the secretary of state's decisions regarding ballot petitions be filed with the state supreme court at least 75 days before the election.[3]

In Virginia, most federal offices have already held their Republican and Democratic conventions to determine the nominee, however, the 1st, 7th and 8th Districts will hold party primaries.

Sen. Lindsey Graham has a handful of challengers for the U.S. Senate Republican primary, but polling has shown him hovering at the necessary 50 percent mark needed to avoid a primary runoff.[4]

Arkansas

See also: Arkansas elections, 2014

State executives

See also: Primary runoff preview: Arkansas attorney general election, 2014


State legislature

Connecticut

See also: Connecticut elections, 2014

Congress

Maine

See also: Maine elections, 2014

Congress

State executives

State legislature

BattlegroundRace.jpg
  • State Senate primaries
    • The Maine State Senate is one of 20 state legislative chambers noted by Ballotpedia staff as being a battleground chamber. The Maine Senate has a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of four seats, which amounts to 11.4 percent of the chamber. In 2012, a total of 14 districts were competitive or mildly competitive. There were seven districts where the margin of victory was 5 percent or less in the 2012 elections. Another seven districts had a margin of victory between 5 and 10 percent.
  • State House primaries

Nevada

See also: Nevada elections, 2014

Congress

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Nevada's 3rd Congressional District is a battleground district in 2014. However, the Cook Political Report and FairVote disagree on just how competitive this election will be. Cook's Partisan Voter Index (PVI) rates Nevada's 3rd District as evenly matched between Democratic and Republican voters.[7] FairVote, on the other hand, rates the district as 43.5% Democratic.[8] This could still make for a competitive race, but one that would most likely favor the Republican candidate. Republican incumbent Joe Heck has only been in office since 2011, but he won re-election in 2012 with a fairly safe 7.5% margin of victory. The district voted Democratic in the 2012 presidential election, but President Barack Obama won the district by a mere 0.8% margin of victory.

As of two weeks before the primary election, Democratic candidate Zachary Campbell did not appear to have any sort of website or to have done any significant advertising or fundraising. News articles simply referred to him as Bilbray-Kohn's "little-known opponent."[9] This leaves Erin Bilbray-Kohn as the most likely recipient of the Democratic nomination in the primary election. Heck maintains a lead in the general election polls, but Bilbray-Kohn contends that she will be able to close the gap.[10]

Municipal government

  • Reno Mayoral election
    • Mayor Bob Cashell is term-limited. Nineteen candidates will face off in this election that will likely require a runoff.
  • Reno City Council election
    • Both incumbents are term-limited. The Ward 2 race has six candidates and the Ward 4 race has seven. Runoff elections are highly likely for both seats.

School boards

  • Clark County School District
    • This primary election features 10 candidates competing for three seats. District G candidate Joe Spencer is running against incumbent Erin E. Cranor and fellow challenger Ira Kimball in the primary. Spencer's public criticisms of Cranor and three other board members resulted in a state ethics investigation of the board. He claimed that the district's governing body used public resources to support a tax levy vote in 2012. Although the Nevada Commission on Ethics agreed that Cranor and the other board members did use district resources to advocate for the levy, the commission also found that the board did not "willfully violate" state law and therefore did not assess a penalty. The top two candidates in each district will proceed to the general election held on November 4, 2014.
  • Washoe County School District
    • This primary election features 10 candidates competing for three seats. Although District B incumbent John R. Mayer is running unopposed to retain his seat, six challengers are competing for the District F seat. The current District 6 officeholder, Estela Gutierrez, decided not to run for re-election. The top two candidates in each district will proceed to the general election held on November 4, 2014.

State executives

State legislature

BattlegroundRace.jpg
  • State Senate primaries
    • The Nevada State Senate is one of 20 state legislative chambers noted by Ballotpedia staff as being a battleground chamber. The Nevada Senate has a difference in partisan balance between Democrats and Republican of one seat, which amounts to 9 percent of the seats up for election in 2014. In 2012, a total of five districts were competitive, with a margin of victory was 5 percent or less.
  • State Assembly primaries

New Jersey

See also: New Jersey elections, 2014

Municipal government

North Dakota

See also: North Dakota elections, 2014

Ballot measures

Congress

School boards

  • Bismarck Public Schools
    • This general election features six candidates competing for three at-large seats. Incumbents Scott Halvorson and Matthew Sagsveen are running for re-election against four challengers. Fellow board member Steve Marquardt decided to run for a seat on the Bismarck City Commission instead.
  • Fargo Public Schools
    • This general election features 11 candidates competing for five at-large seats. Incumbents Dinah Goldenberg and Linda Boyd are running for re-election against nine challengers. Since the school board has nine members, this election has the potential to alter the governing majority on the board. Board members Rusty Papacheck, Rick Steen and Kris Wallman did not file for re-election.

State executives

State legislature

South Carolina

See also: South Carolina elections, 2014

Congress

School boards

State executives

State legislature

Virginia

See also: Virginia elections, 2014

Congress

BattlegroundRace.jpg
Incumbent Scott Rigell will face retired U.S. Navy Reserve Commander Suzanne Patrick and Libertarian Allen Knapp in the general election. The Republican and Democratic parties have provided Rigell and Patrick with additional support for the upcoming election. Rigell is a member of the National Republican Congressional Committee's Patriot Program. The program is designed to assist vulnerable Republican incumbents heading into the 2014 election.[11] Patrick is a member of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's Jumpstart program, which is designed to provide early support to top-tier Democratic challengers.[12] Ballotpedia has identified Virginia's 2nd Congressional District as a battleground race because Cook's PVI shows the district as R+2, and Fairvote rates the district as 43.4% Democratic. In addition, President Barack Obama won the district by 1.5% in 2012 and 1.7% in 2008.

See also

References

Category:2014 electionsCategory:Elections by date