Difference between revisions of "User:PhilH/AZprop1001992"

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==='''[[BC|November 27, 2013]]'''===
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{{fedissuesVNT}}{{tnr}}
''By [mailto:phil.heidenreich@ballotpedia.org Phil Heidenreich]''
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[[File:FederalAffairsLogo-01.png|left|200px|link=Portal:Congress]]
[[File:Supreme Court.jpg|200px|right]]
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This page will track the various high-level [[Appointment confirmation process|nominations]] made by President [[Barack Obama]] in 2014.
'''Washington, D.C.:''' The United States Supreme Court agreed on Tuesday to hear two cases on the constitutionality of Obamacare's employer-mandated coverage of contraceptives. Two companies, Hobby Lobby and a Mennonite-owned cabinet making company, Conestoga Wood Specialties, received opposing judgements in lower courts and their cases were taken on by the Supreme Court. The two cases will be combined and arguments will be heard, likely beginning in March. Press Secretary [[Jay Carney]] commented on the decision of the Court to take on the case, "We believe this requirement is lawful and essential to women’s health and are confident the Supreme Court will agree."<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/supreme-court-to-review-contraceptive-coverage-mandate/2013/11/26/e9627f5a-56bc-11e3-8304-caf30787c0a9_story_1.html ''Washington Post'', "Supreme Court to review contraceptive coverage mandate in health-care law," November 26, 2013]</ref>
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==The Plum Book==
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The ''United States Policy and Supporting Positions'', or Plum Book, is released by the Government Printing Office (GPO) at the start of every presidential term. It lays out which offices in the federal government are to be appointed by the president when vacated.<ref name="FCW">[http://fcw.com/Articles/2012/11/09/hire-presidential-appointees.aspx?Page=1 ''FCW'', "How to become a presidential appointee," November 9,2012]</ref> The Plum Book released for President Obama's second term covered 8,138 presidentially appointed offices.<ref name="plumbook">[http://m.gpo.gov/plumbook/#home ''Plum Book'', "Home," accessed November 20, 2013]</ref> These offices represent both high-level cabinet members, who must be confirmed by the [[United States Senate|Senate]], as well as those who do not require Senate confirmation.  According to the Plum Book, 1,217 positions require confirmation during Obama's second term. As of November 20, 2013, 158 of those 1,217 positions were vacant.<ref name="plumbook"/>
  
Hobby Lobby won a preliminary injunction in the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals before the [[U.S. Department of Justice|Department of Justice]] appealed the case to the Supreme Court.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/11/26/obamacares-birth-control-mandate-is-headed-to-the-supreme-court/?wprss=rss_business&clsrd ''Washington Post'', "Obamacare’s birth control mandate is headed to the Supreme Court," November 26, 2013]</ref> On the other hand, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court's ruling that Conestoga Wood Specialties did not warrant an exemption from the law.<ref>[http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/875985_Conestoga-Wood-Specialties-loses-health-care-law-challenge-in-federal-court.html ''Lancaster Online'', "Conestoga Wood Specialties loses health care law challenge in federal court," July 26, 2013]</ref> The Supreme Court decision could determine whether corporations have the same freedom of religion as individuals.<ref>[http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-usa-court-contraception-20131125,0,6290446.story ''Chicago Tribune'', "Obamacare contraception cases head to Supreme Court," November 26, 2013]</ref>
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==List of 2014 nominees==
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The following is a compilation of notable appointments by Barack Obama during 2013.<ref name="whitehousedata"/>
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{{2014presidentialnominees}}
  
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==Issues==
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==="Nuclear option"===
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On November 21, 2013, Senate Majority Leader [[Harry Reid]] invoked the "nuclear option" in the [[United States Senate|Senate]].  The "nuclear option" is using an interpretation of Senate procedure to be able to change chamber rules with a simple majority vote.  In this case, the option was used to change the vote requirement for executive nominee [[Appointment confirmation process|confirmations]] to be considered on the floor.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/harry-reid-nuclear-option-100199.html ''Politico'', "Senate goes for 'nuclear option'," November 21, 2013]</ref>  Prior to the rule change, Senators could [[filibuster]] until a cloture motion requiring 60 votes was passed in the chamber. The "nuclear option" changed the requirement to a simple majority. The threat of the "nuclear option" occurred in many Congresses, but none had put the option into use.<ref name="wapo"/>[[File:Reid filibuster chart.jpg|right|250px|thumb|Harry Reid's tweeted chart from November 21, 2013]]
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The "nuclear option" was invoked in response to Senate Republicans blocking the nomination of three D.C. Circuit Court judges. The rule change passed by a vote of 52-48, with [[Carl Levin]], [[Joe Manchin]] and [[Mark Pryor]] being the only Democrats to vote in opposition. According to the Congressional Research Service, of the 67 times between 1967 and 2012 the filibuster was used on a judicial nominee, 31 have been during during the Obama administration.<ref name="wapo">[http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/senate-poised-to-limit-filibusters-in-party-line-vote-that-would-alter-centuries-of-precedent/2013/11/21/d065cfe8-52b6-11e3-9fe0-fd2ca728e67c_story.html ''Washington Post'', "Reid, Democrats trigger 'nuclear' option; eliminate most filibusters on nominees," November 21, 2013]</ref>
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====Reid's "filibuster" graphic====
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When invoking the "nuclear option," Reid tweeted a graphic suggesting half of the filibusters on nominees in the history of the United States had been used against Obama nominees. The graphic was based on a Congressional Research Service (CRS) report on "cloture attempts at nominations," which, while closely correlated, the CRS acknowledged was not an accurate measurement for counting uses of the filibuster. The ''Washington Post'' reported that while many of Obama's nominees were delayed in the [[Appointment confirmation process|confirmation process]], only 12 did not reach a final vote.  For comparison, President George W. Bush had 14 nominees not reach a final vote during his terms as president. Reid later corrected the graphic to show the correct metrics.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/wp/2013/11/26/harry-reids-tweet-on-obamas-filibustered-nominees/ ''Washington Post'', "Harry Reid's tweet on Obama's 'filibustered' nominees," November 26, 2013]</ref>
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===Delayed nominations===
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According to data drawn from the White House, the average time between a nomination and confirmation during the 111th Congress for the 537 executive nominees was 115.5 days. In 112th Congress, the average time between a nomination and confirmation for the 525 executive nominees was 168.5 days. As of August 1, 2013, the average time for confirmed nominees in the 113th Congress was 86.0 days, 212 days into the session.<ref>[https://docs.google.com/a/ballotpedia.org/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiQnNa6PrE_pdEZ1cVlUVU9IdTJTbEdZRWNFRm1nbFE&usp=drive_web#gid=3 ''Obama nominees by Presidency and Congress'', "111th Congress," accessed December 12, 2013]</ref><ref name="whitehousedata">[http://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/nominations-and-appointments ''The White House'', "Nominations and Appointments," accessed December 12, 2013]</ref>
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===Blocked nominations===
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On October 31, 2013, the nomination of Rep. [[Mel Watt]] (D-NC) to the Federal Housing Finance Agency was blocked by Senate Republicans by means of a filibuster.  Cloture was not reached with a vote of 56-42, leaving Watt the first sitting congressman to be denied confirmation to an appointed office since 1843.<ref name="wapoblock">[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-politics/wp/2013/10/31/senate-gop-blocks-mel-watt-nomination/ ''Washington Post'', "Senate GOP blocks Mel Watt nomination," October 31, 2013]</ref> Both the [[Barack Obama|Obama]] administration and Senate Majority Leader [[Harry Reid]] were hopeful of a future confirmation.<ref>[http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/10/31/mel-watt-filibuster-senate/3324165/ ''USA Today'', "Reid says he will try again to push Watt nomination," October 31, 2013]</ref>  Sen. [[Lindsey Graham]] insisted he would block every nominee until more information on Benghazi was released, while Sen. [[Rand Paul]] stated he would block the nomination of [[Janet Yellen]] until his Federal Reserve bill was passed.<ref name="wapoblock"/>
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Three of the president's nominees to the D.C. Circuit Court, Robert Wilkins, Nina Pillard and Patricia Millett were blocked by the [[United States Senate|Senate]] using the filibuster.  Senate [[Democrat|Democrats]] could not overcome the 60 votes required to reach the simple majority vote for confirmation.  Republicans argued they haven't approved any of the nominees because "It's the least busy court in the country," according to [[Mitch McConnell]]. <ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/robert-wilkins-republicans-block-judge-100021.html ''Politico'', "Republicans block third judicial appointee," November 18, 2013]</ref>
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In December 2013, [[Mel Watt]] and Patricia Millett were among the first nominees to be confirmed following the "nuclear option."<ref>[http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304014504579250433884095714 ''Wall Street Journal'', "Behind the Filibuster Flurry," December 11, 2013]</ref>
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===Threats to delay nominees===
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====Hold====
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According to the [[United States Senate]], a ''hold'' is "An informal practice by which a senator informs his or her floor leader that he or she does not wish a particular bill or other measure to reach the floor for consideration. The majority leader need not follow the senator's wishes, but is on notice that the opposing senator may filibuster any motion to proceed to consider the measure."<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/glossary_term/hold.htm ''U.S. Senate'', "Glossary," accessed November 20, 2013]</ref>
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[[Republican|Republicans]] threatened to block Obama's presidential nominees through the use of [[Appointment confirmation process|holds]] for various political reasons. Since the [[Democratic Party]] holds the majority in the chamber, the Majority Leader, [[Harry Reid]], can move the nominations to the floor but would risk the possibility of a filibuster.
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=====2013 uses=====
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====Filibuster====
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According to the [[United States Senate]] a ''filibuster'' is an "Informal term for any attempt to block or delay Senate action on a bill or other matter by debating it at length, by offering numerous procedural motions, or by any other delaying or obstructive actions."<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/glossary_term/filibuster.htm ''U.S. Senate'', "Glossary," accessed November 20, 2013]</ref>
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=====Cloture votes=====
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According to the [[United States Senate]] ''cloture'' is "The only procedure by which the Senate can vote to place a time limit on consideration of a bill or other matter, and thereby overcome a filibuster."<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/glossary_term/cloture.htm ''U.S. Senate'', "Glossary," accessed December 12, 2013]</ref> When the "nuclear option" was invoked by Sen. [[Harry Reid]], the rules for cloture votes were changed from a requirement of 60 votes to break a filibuster to only a majority, significantly weakening the use of the filibuster to delay confirmation votes. Once a cloture motion is passed, one session day must pass before up to 30 hours of debate take place. A CRS report stated an average of 5.03 days passed between the day the motion passed and the day the bill was taken up.[[File:Rand Paul Filibuster.png|right|250px|thumb|Rand Paul during his 13 hour filibuster]]
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=====2013 uses=====
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==Recent news==
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This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term '''Obama + Federal + Nominees + 2013'''
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:''All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.''
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<rss>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&gl=us&q=Obama+Federal+Nominees+2013&um=1&ie=UTF-8&output=rss|template=slpfeed|max=10|title=2013 Obama Nominees News Feed</rss>
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
{{bpnews}}
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*[[Possible 2016 U.S. Presidential candidates]]
*[[Jay Carney]]
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*[[Obama's 2013 federal nominees]]
*[[Kathleen Sebelius]]
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*[[U.S. Department of Justice]]
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==References==
 
==References==
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{{federal affairs}}
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Revision as of 16:46, 13 December 2013


FederalAffairsLogo-01.png

Federal Issues

Economy
United States budget debate, 2013American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
National security
Obama administration past and current views on SyriaUnited States involvement in Syria2012 Benghazi attack overview
Healthcare
Obamacare overviewHealth insurance policy cancellations since ObamacareHealthcare.gov website rolloutVeterans Affairs' secret waiting lists
Federal nominees
Obama's federal nominees, 2013Rand Paul filibuster of John Brennan's CIA Nomination in March 2013
Taxation
IRS targeting allegations
FederalAffairsLogo-01.png

This page will track the various high-level nominations made by President Barack Obama in 2014.

The Plum Book

The United States Policy and Supporting Positions, or Plum Book, is released by the Government Printing Office (GPO) at the start of every presidential term. It lays out which offices in the federal government are to be appointed by the president when vacated.[1] The Plum Book released for President Obama's second term covered 8,138 presidentially appointed offices.[2] These offices represent both high-level cabinet members, who must be confirmed by the Senate, as well as those who do not require Senate confirmation. According to the Plum Book, 1,217 positions require confirmation during Obama's second term. As of November 20, 2013, 158 of those 1,217 positions were vacant.[2]

List of 2014 nominees

The following is a compilation of notable appointments by Barack Obama during 2013.[3] Template:2014presidentialnominees

Issues

"Nuclear option"

On November 21, 2013, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid invoked the "nuclear option" in the Senate. The "nuclear option" is using an interpretation of Senate procedure to be able to change chamber rules with a simple majority vote. In this case, the option was used to change the vote requirement for executive nominee confirmations to be considered on the floor.[4] Prior to the rule change, Senators could filibuster until a cloture motion requiring 60 votes was passed in the chamber. The "nuclear option" changed the requirement to a simple majority. The threat of the "nuclear option" occurred in many Congresses, but none had put the option into use.[5]
Harry Reid's tweeted chart from November 21, 2013

The "nuclear option" was invoked in response to Senate Republicans blocking the nomination of three D.C. Circuit Court judges. The rule change passed by a vote of 52-48, with Carl Levin, Joe Manchin and Mark Pryor being the only Democrats to vote in opposition. According to the Congressional Research Service, of the 67 times between 1967 and 2012 the filibuster was used on a judicial nominee, 31 have been during during the Obama administration.[5]

Reid's "filibuster" graphic

When invoking the "nuclear option," Reid tweeted a graphic suggesting half of the filibusters on nominees in the history of the United States had been used against Obama nominees. The graphic was based on a Congressional Research Service (CRS) report on "cloture attempts at nominations," which, while closely correlated, the CRS acknowledged was not an accurate measurement for counting uses of the filibuster. The Washington Post reported that while many of Obama's nominees were delayed in the confirmation process, only 12 did not reach a final vote. For comparison, President George W. Bush had 14 nominees not reach a final vote during his terms as president. Reid later corrected the graphic to show the correct metrics.[6]

Delayed nominations

According to data drawn from the White House, the average time between a nomination and confirmation during the 111th Congress for the 537 executive nominees was 115.5 days. In 112th Congress, the average time between a nomination and confirmation for the 525 executive nominees was 168.5 days. As of August 1, 2013, the average time for confirmed nominees in the 113th Congress was 86.0 days, 212 days into the session.[7][3]

Blocked nominations

On October 31, 2013, the nomination of Rep. Mel Watt (D-NC) to the Federal Housing Finance Agency was blocked by Senate Republicans by means of a filibuster. Cloture was not reached with a vote of 56-42, leaving Watt the first sitting congressman to be denied confirmation to an appointed office since 1843.[8] Both the Obama administration and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid were hopeful of a future confirmation.[9] Sen. Lindsey Graham insisted he would block every nominee until more information on Benghazi was released, while Sen. Rand Paul stated he would block the nomination of Janet Yellen until his Federal Reserve bill was passed.[8]

Three of the president's nominees to the D.C. Circuit Court, Robert Wilkins, Nina Pillard and Patricia Millett were blocked by the Senate using the filibuster. Senate Democrats could not overcome the 60 votes required to reach the simple majority vote for confirmation. Republicans argued they haven't approved any of the nominees because "It's the least busy court in the country," according to Mitch McConnell. [10]

In December 2013, Mel Watt and Patricia Millett were among the first nominees to be confirmed following the "nuclear option."[11]

Threats to delay nominees

Hold

According to the United States Senate, a hold is "An informal practice by which a senator informs his or her floor leader that he or she does not wish a particular bill or other measure to reach the floor for consideration. The majority leader need not follow the senator's wishes, but is on notice that the opposing senator may filibuster any motion to proceed to consider the measure."[12]

Republicans threatened to block Obama's presidential nominees through the use of holds for various political reasons. Since the Democratic Party holds the majority in the chamber, the Majority Leader, Harry Reid, can move the nominations to the floor but would risk the possibility of a filibuster.

2013 uses

Filibuster

According to the United States Senate a filibuster is an "Informal term for any attempt to block or delay Senate action on a bill or other matter by debating it at length, by offering numerous procedural motions, or by any other delaying or obstructive actions."[13]

Cloture votes
According to the United States Senate cloture is "The only procedure by which the Senate can vote to place a time limit on consideration of a bill or other matter, and thereby overcome a filibuster."[14] When the "nuclear option" was invoked by Sen. Harry Reid, the rules for cloture votes were changed from a requirement of 60 votes to break a filibuster to only a majority, significantly weakening the use of the filibuster to delay confirmation votes. Once a cloture motion is passed, one session day must pass before up to 30 hours of debate take place. A CRS report stated an average of 5.03 days passed between the day the motion passed and the day the bill was taken up.
Rand Paul during his 13 hour filibuster
2013 uses

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term Obama + Federal + Nominees + 2013

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

  • Loading...

See also

References