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{{tnr}}Title: '''Barack Obama's 2013 federal nominees'''
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{{Short department profile
[[File:FederalAffairsLogo-01.png|left|200px|link=Portal:Congress]]
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|name = Department of the Interior
This page will track the various high-level [[Appointment confirmation process|nominations]] made by President [[Barack Obama]] in 2013.  
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|image = US-DeptOfEducation-Seal.svg
==The Plum Book==
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|secretary =  
The ''United States Policy and Supporting Positions'', or Plum Book, is released by the Government Printing Office (GPO) at the start of every presidential term. It lays out which offices in the federal government are to be appointed by the president when vacated.<ref name="FCW">[http://fcw.com/Articles/2012/11/09/hire-presidential-appointees.aspx?Page=1 ''FCW'', "How to become a presidential appointee," November 9,2012]</ref> The Plum Book released for President Obama's second term covered 8,138 presidentially appointed offices.<ref name="plumbook">[http://m.gpo.gov/plumbook/#home ''Plum Book'', "Home," accessed November 20, 2013]</ref> These offices represent both high-level cabinet members, who must be confirmed by the [[United States Senate|Senate]] as well as those that do not require Senate confirmation.  According to the Plum Book, 1,217 positions require confirmation during Obama's second term. As of November 20, 2013, 158 of those 1,217 positions remain vacant.<ref name="plumbook"/>
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|deputy secretary =  
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|budget =  
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|employment =  
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|year =  
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|website = http://www.doi.gov/index.cfm
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}}{{tnr}}{{ExecDeptsbox}}The '''Department of the Interior''' is a United States executive department established in 1980.  The Department was formed to promote educational excellence and ensure equal opportunity for public schooling.<ref name="DOEabout">[http://www.treasury.gov/about/education/Documents/brochure%20(1).pdf ''U.S. Department of Education'', "ABOUT ED: OVERVIEW AND MISSION STATEMENT," accessed October 2, 2013]</ref> The Department is led by the current Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan.
  
==List of 2013 nominees==
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The Department employs 4,400 employees.<ref name="DOEabout"/>  The operating budget for fiscal year 2013 was $65.7 billion.<ref name="budget"/>  The United States education industry was estimated at about $1.15 trillion in 2011-2012.  Federal contributions to elementary and secondary education come to about 10.8%, including the Department of Education, the Department of Health and Human Services' Head Start and the Department of Agriculture's School Lunch program.  The rest of the funding comes from state, local and private sources.<ref name="hist"/>
The following is a compilation of notable appointments by Barack Obama during 2013.
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==History==
{{2013presidentialnominees}}
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The Office of Education was formed in 1867 to help establish an effective education system.  The Office's role was in collecting information from schools to determine high impact policies and practices.  Following is a list of important dates in education policy:<ref name="hist">[http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/fed/role.html ''U.S. Department of Education'', "The Federal Role in Education," accessed October 3, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.today.com/id/39154333/ns/today-back_to_school/t/timeline-moments-changed-public-education/#.Uk2aS4aUTxw ''Today'', "Timeline: Moments that changed public education," accessed October 3, 2013]</ref>
 +
*1890: Second Morrill Act gave the Office authority to establish a support system for land-grant colleges and universities
 +
*1896: U.S. Supreme Court case, ''Plessy v. Ferguson'', legalized segregation in "separate but equal" schools
 +
*1917: Smith-Hughes Act extended federal aid to vocational education programs
 +
*1946: Georgia-Barden Act established agricultural, industrial and home economics classes
 +
*1944: GI Bill authorized assistance to veterans for postsecondary schools
 +
*1954: U.S. Supreme Court case, ''Brown v. Board of Education'', outlaws segregation precedent set in ''Plessy v. Ferguson''
 +
*1958: National Defense Education Act (NDEA) supported loans for college students, improved science, technology and foreign language support in elementary and secondary schools and provided fellowships in response to the Cold War
 +
*1964: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act prohibited discrimination based on race, color or national origin in public schools
 +
*1965: Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act gave federal aid to schools in poor rural and urban areas
 +
*1965: Higher Education Act authorized federal aid for poor postsecondary students
 +
*1970: Standardized tests were given to public schools and the results are reported to the government and public in an effort to hold educators accountable
 +
*1972: Title IX of the Education Amendments prohibited discrimination based on sex in public schools
 +
*1973: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibited discrimination based on disability in public schools
 +
*1980: the Department of Education was officially formed by Congress
 +
*2001: No Child Left Behind program increased education funding and established standards-based testing reforms
 +
*2010: Race to the Top program encouraging states to compete for federal grants in education
  
==Issues==
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==Structure==
==="Nuclear option"===
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===Mission===
On November 21, 2013, Senate Majority Leader [[Harry Reid]] invoked the "nuclear option" in the [[United States Senate|Senate]].  The "nuclear option" is using an interpretation of Senate procedure to be able to change chamber rules with a simple majority vote.  In this case, the option was used to change the vote requirement for executive nominee [[Appointment confirmation process|confirmations]] to be considered on the floor.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/harry-reid-nuclear-option-100199.html ''Politico'', "Senate goes for 'nuclear option'," November 21, 2013]</ref> Prior to the rule change, Senators could [[filibuster]] until a cloture motion requiring 60 votes was passed in the chamber. The "nuclear option" changed the requirement to a simple majority. The threat of the "nuclear option" occurred in many Congresses, but none had put the option into use.<ref name="wapo"/>[[File:Reid filibuster chart.jpg|right|250px|thumb|Harry Reid's tweeted chart from November 21, 2013]]
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The Department of Education website states the mission:<ref>[http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/om/fs_po/osods/intro.html ''U.S. Department of Education'', "Offices," accessed October 2, 2013]</ref>
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{{Quote|The mission of the Department of Education is to ensure equal access to education and to promote educational excellence throughout the nation.}}
  
The "nuclear option" was invoked in response to Senate Republicans blocking the nomination of three D.C. Circuit Court judges. The rule change passed by a vote of 52-48, with [[Carl Levin]], [[Joe Manchin]] and [[Mark Pryor]] being the only Democrats to vote in opposition. According to the Congressional Research Service, of the 67 times between 1967 and 2012 the filibuster was used on a judicial nominee, 31 have been during during the Obama administration.<ref name="wapo">[http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/senate-poised-to-limit-filibusters-in-party-line-vote-that-would-alter-centuries-of-precedent/2013/11/21/d065cfe8-52b6-11e3-9fe0-fd2ca728e67c_story.html ''Washington Post'', "Reid, Democrats trigger 'nuclear' option; eliminate most filibusters on nominees," November 21, 2013]</ref>
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===Leadership===
====Reid's "filibuster" graphic====
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The current Secretary of Education is Arne Duncan.
When invoking the "nuclear option," Reid tweeted a graphic suggesting half of the filibusters on nominees in the history of the United States had been used against Obama nominees. The graphic was based on a Congressional Research Service (CRS) report on "cloture attempts at nominations," which, while closely correlated, the CRS acknowledged was not an accurate measurement for counting uses of the filibuster. The ''Washington Post'' reported that while many of Obama's nominees were delayed in the [[Appointment confirmation process|confirmation process]], only 12 did not reach a final vote.  For comparison, President George W. Bush had 14 nominees not reach a final vote during his terms as president. Reid later corrected the graphic to show the correct metrics.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/fact-checker/wp/2013/11/26/harry-reids-tweet-on-obamas-filibustered-nominees/ ''Washington Post'', "Harry Reid's tweet on Obama's 'filibustered' nominees," November 26, 2013]</ref>
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===Delayed nominations===
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{{SOEhistoricallist}}
According to data drawn from the White House, the average time between a nomination and confirmation during the 111th Congress for the 537 executive nominees was 115.5 days. In 112th Congress, the average time between a nomination and confirmation for the 525 executive nominees was 168.5 days. As of August 1, 2013, the average time for confirmed nominees in the 113th Congress was 86.0 days, 212 days into the session.<ref>[https://docs.google.com/a/ballotpedia.org/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiQnNa6PrE_pdEZ1cVlUVU9IdTJTbEdZRWNFRm1nbFE&usp=drive_web#gid=3 ''Obama nominees by Presidency and Congress'', "111th Congress," accessed December 12, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/nominations-and-appointments ''The White House'', "Nominations and Appointments," accessed December 12, 2013]</ref>
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===Blocked nominations===
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===Departments===
On October 31, 2013, the nomination of Rep. [[Mel Watt]] (D-NC) to the Federal Housing Finance Agency was blocked by Senate Republicans by means of a filibuster.  Cloture was not reached with a vote of 56-42, leaving Watt the first sitting congressman to be denied confirmation to an appointed office since 1843.<ref name="wapoblock">[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-politics/wp/2013/10/31/senate-gop-blocks-mel-watt-nomination/ ''Washington Post'', "Senate GOP blocks Mel Watt nomination," October 31, 2013]</ref> Both the [[Barack Obama|Obama]] administration and Senate Majority Leader [[Harry Reid]] were hopeful of a future confirmation.<ref>[http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/10/31/mel-watt-filibuster-senate/3324165/ ''USA Today'', "Reid says he will try again to push Watt nomination," October 31, 2013]</ref>  Sen. [[Lindsey Graham]] insisted he would block every nominee until more information on Benghazi was released, while Sen. [[Rand Paul]] stated he would block the nomination of [[Janet Yellen]] until his Federal Reserve bill was passed.<ref name="wapoblock"/>
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====Office of the Secretary of Education====
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According to the Department's official website, the Office of the Secretary:<ref>[http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/om/fs_po/osods/office.html ''U.S. Department of Education'', "US Department of Education *Principal Office Functional Statements," accessed October 2, 2013]</ref>
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*Provides advice on a wide range of policy matters and issues.
 +
*Maintains White House liaison on personnel and scheduling matters and on sensitive political issues.
 +
*Supervises Federal advisory committee establishment and operating procedures and coordinates the provision of administrative services.
 +
*Coordinates the processing and placement for all appointments for non–career and advisory council positions.
 +
*Responds to appropriate inquiries concerning the Secretary's views and positions.
 +
*Reviews communications going to the Secretary for signature or information to assure that the Secretary's specific interests, viewpoints, and policy are properly reflected.
 +
*Prepares and coordinates the preparation of all speeches and comments for the Secretary's use, and arranges for all substitutes when the Secretary is unable to be present at a function external to the Department.
 +
*Carries out priority assignments and special projects for the Secretary.
 +
*Coordinates and conducts, in cooperation with the Office of Inspector General, the development of advance security planning and surveys involving risk analysis for the Secretary's speaking engagements and travel, and provides a security presence at all official social functions attended by the Secretary.
 +
====Organizational chart====
 +
[[File:Doe org chart.gif]]
  
Three of the president's nominees to the D.C. Circuit Court, Robert Wilkins, Nina Pillard and Patricia Millett were blocked by the [[United States Senate|Senate]] using the filibuster. Senate [[Democrat|Democrats]] could not overcome the 60 votes required to reach the simple majority vote for confirmation. Republicans argued they haven't approved any of the nominees because "It's the least busy court in the country," according to [[Mitch McConnell]]. <ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/robert-wilkins-republicans-block-judge-100021.html ''Politico'', "Republicans block third judicial appointee," November 18, 2013]</ref>
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==Analysis==
 +
===Budget===
 +
The Department of Education had a budget of $67.3 billion for the fiscal year 2012. The Department's request for fiscal year 2013 was $65.7 billion, a 2.3% decrease.<ref name="DOEabout"/><ref name="budget">[http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/budget13/13action.pdf ''U.S. Department of Education'', "DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FISCAL YEAR 2013 OPERATING PLAN," accessed October 3, 2013]</ref>
  
===Threats to delay nominees===
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===Employment===
====Hold====
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''The Best Places to work in the Federal Government'' is a website that tracks workforce trends in federal agencies.  According to their analysis, from 2005-2011, the Department of Education has gained an average of 26 jobs per year. <ref name="BestPlaces">[http://bestplacestowork.org/BPTW/rankings/detail/ED00 ''Best Places to Work in the Federal Government'', "Department of Education," accessed October 2, 2013]</ref>
According to the [[United States Senate]] a ''hold'' is "An informal practice by which a senator informs his or her floor leader that he or she does not wish a particular bill or other measure to reach the floor for consideration. The majority leader need not follow the senator's wishes, but is on notice that the opposing senator may filibuster any motion to proceed to consider the measure."<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/glossary_term/hold.htm ''U.S. Senate'', "Glossary," accessed November 20, 2013]</ref>
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[[Republican|Republicans]] threatened to block Obama's presidential nominees through the use of [[Appointment confirmation process|holds]] for various political reasons. Since the [[Democratic Party]] holds the majority in the chamber, the Majority Leader, [[Harry Reid]], can move the nominations to the floor but would risk the possibility of a filibuster.
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===Sequestration===
 
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While Secretary Duncan suggested the cuts would result in furloughs, a May 10, 2013, memo states no furloughs were necessary.<ref>[http://www.govexec.com/management/2013/05/furlough-watch-potential-agency-agency-impacts-sequestration/61535/ ''Govovernment Executive'', "Furlough Watch: Agency-by-Agency Impacts of Sequestration," May 30, 2013]</ref>
=====2013 uses=====
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*On November 20, Sen. [[Chuck Grassley]] placed a hold on the nomination of [[Jeh Johnson]] to secretary of Homeland Security until Johnson agreed to cooperate on oversight matters and work with the Senate to improve immigration policy.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/chuck-grassley-jeh-johnson-dhs-100162.html?hp=r4 ''Politico'', "Chuck Grassley puts hold on DHS nominee," November 20, 2013]</ref>
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*On November 3, Sens. [[John McCain]] and [[Lindsey Graham]] threatened to block the nomination of [[Janet Yellen]] until access to the 2012 Benghazi attack survivors was granted.<ref>[http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2013/11/05/nominees-fight-looks-unlikely-to-hold-up-yellen/ ''Washington Post'', "Nominees Fight Looks Unlikely to Hold Up Yellen," November 5, 2013]</ref>
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*On October 31, Sen. [[Kirsten Gillibrand]] placed a hold on the nomination of Jo Ann Rooney to undersecretary of the Navy due to comments on the handling of sexual assault cases in the military.<ref>[http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/politics/2013/10/8535342/gillibrand-puts-hold-navy-nominee-after-shocking-answers-assault ''Capital'', "Gillibrand puts a hold on a Navy nominee after 'shocking' answers on assault," October 31, 2013]</ref>
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*On October 30, Sen. [[Rand Paul]] said in a statement he would place a hold on [[Janet Yellen]]'s nomination in an effort to push legislation requiring audits of the Federal Reserve.<ref>[http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-politics/wp/2013/10/30/sen-rand-paul-will-block-yellens-nomination/ ''Washington Post'', "Sen. Rand Paul will block Yellen's nomination," October 30, 2013]</ref>
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*On October 17, Sen. [[Ted Cruz]] placed a hold on the nomination of Tom Wheeler to lead the Federal Communications Commission until Wheeler agreed not to require more disclosures on political advertising.<ref>[http://blogs.wsj.com/washwire/2013/10/17/sen-cruz-places-hold-on-obama-nominee/ ''Wall Street Journal'', "Sen. Cruz Places Hold on Obama Nominee," October 17, 2013]</ref> Cruz lifted the hold on October citing coorespondence with Wheeler about disclosures for political ads.<ref>[http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10-29/cruz-says-he-s-lifting-hold-on-obama-fcc-nominee-wheeler.html ''Bloomberg'', "Cruz Says He’s Lifting Hold on Obama FCC Nominee Wheeler," October 29, 2013]</ref>
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*On February 10, Sen. [[Lindsey Graham]] began his threat to place holds on nominees until the administration released more information about the Benghazi terror attack. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and CIA Director John Brennan were the first to have holds placed on them by Graham.<ref>[http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/11/us/politics/republican-threatens-to-block-hagel-and-brennan.html ''New York Times'', "Republican Threatens to Block Pentagon and C.I.A. Nominees," February 10, 2013]</ref>
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====Filibuster====
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According to the [[United States Senate]] a ''filibuster'' is an "Informal term for any attempt to block or delay Senate action on a bill or other matter by debating it at length, by offering numerous procedural motions, or by any other delaying or obstructive actions."<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/glossary_term/filibuster.htm ''U.S. Senate'', "Glossary," accessed November 20, 2013]</ref>
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=====Cloture votes=====
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According to the [[United States Senate]] ''cloture'' is "The only procedure by which the Senate can vote to place a time limit on consideration of a bill or other matter, and thereby overcome a filibuster."<ref>[http://www.senate.gov/reference/glossary_term/cloture.htm ''U.S. Senate'', "Glossary," accessed December 12, 2013]</ref> When the "nuclear option" was invoked by Sen. [[Harry Reid]], the rules for cloture votes were changed from a requirement of 60 votes to break a filibuster to only a majority, significantly weakening the use of the filibuster to delay confirmation votes. Once a cloture motion is passed, one session day must pass before up to 30 hours of debate take place. A CRS report stated an average of 5.03 days passed between the day the motion passed and the day the bill was taken up.
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=====2013 uses=====
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*On March 6, 2013, [[United States Senate|U.S. Senator]] [[Rand Paul]] (R) [[Rand Paul filibuster of John Brennan's CIA Nomination in March 2013|led a nearly 13-hour filibuster]] of [[Barack Obama|President Obama's]] CIA Director nominee, John Brennan. Paul started the filibuster in order to highlight his concerns about the administration's drone policies. In particular, Paul said he was concerned about whether a drone could be used to kill an American citizen within the United States border, without any due process involved. Paul and other civil liberties activists have been critical that President Obama did not offer a clear response to the question. A total of 14 senators joined Paul in the filibuster -- 13 Republicans and one Democrat.<ref>[http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2013/03/07/rand-paul-says-hes-heard-from-white-house-after-filibuster/ ''CNN'' "Rand Paul says he's heard from White House after filibuster," March 7, 2013]</ref><ref>[http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2013/03/rand-paul-wins-applause-from-gop-and-liberals/ ''ABC News'' "Rand Paul Wins Applause From GOP and Liberals," March 7, 2013]</ref>
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*On December 11, 2013, Senate Republicans began to rebel against the use of the "nuclear option" by forcing delays using as much as possible of the "post-cloture debate time." For nine of the ten names that were on Majority Leader [[Harry Reid]]'s list, 8 hours of debate can be demanded, while [[Jeh Johnson]]'s nomination allows for up to 30 hours of debate. On the use of the tactic to delay nominations, Reid stated, "It is hard to imagine a more pointless exercise than spending an entire day waiting for a vote whose outcome we already know. But Republicans insist on wasting time simply for the sake of wasting time."<ref>[http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/11/politics/senate-all-nighter/ ''CNN'', "Senate pulls an all-nighter, approves federal appeals court nominee," December 12, 2013]</ref>
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==Recent news==
 
==Recent news==
This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term '''Obama + Federal + Nominees + 2013'''
+
This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term '''U.S. + Department + Education'''
  
 
:''All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.''
 
:''All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.''
  
<rss>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&gl=us&q=Obama+Federal+Nominees+2013&um=1&ie=UTF-8&output=rss|template=slpfeed|max=10|title=2013 Obama Nominees News Feed</rss>
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{{RSS|feed=http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&gl=us&q=U.S.+Department+Education&um=1&ie=UTF-8&output=rss|template=slpfeed|max=10|title=U.S. Department of Education News Feed}}
==See also==
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*[[Possible 2016 U.S. Presidential candidates]]
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==External links==
 +
*[http://www.ed.gov Official Department of Education website]
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*[http://www.ed.gov/blog/ Department of Education blog]
 +
*[https://www.facebook.com/ed.gov Official Facebook page]
 +
*[https://twitter.com/usedgov Official Twitter page]
 +
*[http://www.youtube.com/user/usedgov Official Youtube channel]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
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[[Category:Executive departments of the United States]]
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{{federal affairs}}

Revision as of 15:18, 13 December 2013

Department of the Interior
US-DeptOfEducation-Seal.svg
Official website:http://www.doi.gov/index.cfm

FederalAffairsLogo-01.png

Executive Departments of the United States

Executive Departments
Department of DefenseDepartment of StateDepartment of Homeland SecurityDepartment of JusticeDepartment of CommerceDepartment of EducationDepartment of the TreasuryDepartment of AgricultureDepartment of EnergyDepartment of LaborDepartment of TransportationDepartment of the InteriorDepartment of Health and Human ServicesDepartment of Veterans AffairsDepartment of Housing and Urban Development

Department Secretaries
Chuck HagelJohn KerryJeh JohnsonEric HolderPenny PritzkerArne DuncanJack LewTom VilsackErnest MonizTom PerezAnthony FoxxSally JewellSylvia Mathews BurwellRobert McDonaldJulian Castro
The Department of the Interior is a United States executive department established in 1980. The Department was formed to promote educational excellence and ensure equal opportunity for public schooling.[1] The Department is led by the current Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan.

The Department employs 4,400 employees.[1] The operating budget for fiscal year 2013 was $65.7 billion.[2] The United States education industry was estimated at about $1.15 trillion in 2011-2012. Federal contributions to elementary and secondary education come to about 10.8%, including the Department of Education, the Department of Health and Human Services' Head Start and the Department of Agriculture's School Lunch program. The rest of the funding comes from state, local and private sources.[3]

History

The Office of Education was formed in 1867 to help establish an effective education system. The Office's role was in collecting information from schools to determine high impact policies and practices. Following is a list of important dates in education policy:[3][4]

  • 1890: Second Morrill Act gave the Office authority to establish a support system for land-grant colleges and universities
  • 1896: U.S. Supreme Court case, Plessy v. Ferguson, legalized segregation in "separate but equal" schools
  • 1917: Smith-Hughes Act extended federal aid to vocational education programs
  • 1946: Georgia-Barden Act established agricultural, industrial and home economics classes
  • 1944: GI Bill authorized assistance to veterans for postsecondary schools
  • 1954: U.S. Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education, outlaws segregation precedent set in Plessy v. Ferguson
  • 1958: National Defense Education Act (NDEA) supported loans for college students, improved science, technology and foreign language support in elementary and secondary schools and provided fellowships in response to the Cold War
  • 1964: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act prohibited discrimination based on race, color or national origin in public schools
  • 1965: Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act gave federal aid to schools in poor rural and urban areas
  • 1965: Higher Education Act authorized federal aid for poor postsecondary students
  • 1970: Standardized tests were given to public schools and the results are reported to the government and public in an effort to hold educators accountable
  • 1972: Title IX of the Education Amendments prohibited discrimination based on sex in public schools
  • 1973: Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibited discrimination based on disability in public schools
  • 1980: the Department of Education was officially formed by Congress
  • 2001: No Child Left Behind program increased education funding and established standards-based testing reforms
  • 2010: Race to the Top program encouraging states to compete for federal grants in education

Structure

Mission

The Department of Education website states the mission:[5]

The mission of the Department of Education is to ensure equal access to education and to promote educational excellence throughout the nation.[6]

Leadership

The current Secretary of Education is Arne Duncan.

Note: Votes marked "N/A" represent voice votes or unrecorded votes.

Departments

Office of the Secretary of Education

According to the Department's official website, the Office of the Secretary:[7]

  • Provides advice on a wide range of policy matters and issues.
  • Maintains White House liaison on personnel and scheduling matters and on sensitive political issues.
  • Supervises Federal advisory committee establishment and operating procedures and coordinates the provision of administrative services.
  • Coordinates the processing and placement for all appointments for non–career and advisory council positions.
  • Responds to appropriate inquiries concerning the Secretary's views and positions.
  • Reviews communications going to the Secretary for signature or information to assure that the Secretary's specific interests, viewpoints, and policy are properly reflected.
  • Prepares and coordinates the preparation of all speeches and comments for the Secretary's use, and arranges for all substitutes when the Secretary is unable to be present at a function external to the Department.
  • Carries out priority assignments and special projects for the Secretary.
  • Coordinates and conducts, in cooperation with the Office of Inspector General, the development of advance security planning and surveys involving risk analysis for the Secretary's speaking engagements and travel, and provides a security presence at all official social functions attended by the Secretary.

Organizational chart

Doe org chart.gif

Analysis

Budget

The Department of Education had a budget of $67.3 billion for the fiscal year 2012. The Department's request for fiscal year 2013 was $65.7 billion, a 2.3% decrease.[1][2]

Employment

The Best Places to work in the Federal Government is a website that tracks workforce trends in federal agencies. According to their analysis, from 2005-2011, the Department of Education has gained an average of 26 jobs per year. [8]

Sequestration

While Secretary Duncan suggested the cuts would result in furloughs, a May 10, 2013, memo states no furloughs were necessary.[9]

Recent news

This section displays the most recent stories in a Google news search for the term U.S. + Department + Education

All stories may not be relevant to this page due to the nature of the search engine.

U.S. Department of Education News Feed

  • Loading...

External links

References