Virginia's 10th Congressional District

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The 10th Congressional District of Virginia is a congressional district in the commonwealth of Virginia.

Virginia's 10th Congressional District is located in the northern portion of the state and includes Frederick, Clarke and Loudon counties and parts of Fairfax County.[1]

The district previously included portions of Clarke, Fairfax, Fauquier, Frederick, Loudoun, Prince William, and Warren counties.

The current representative of the 10th congressional district is Frank Wolf (R).

Elections

2012

See also: Virginia's 10th congressional district elections, 2012

The 10th congressional district of Virginia held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Frank Wolf won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Virginia District 10 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Kristin Cabral 38.8% 142,024
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngFrank Wolf Incumbent 58.4% 214,038
     Independent Kevin Chisholm 2.7% 9,855
     Write-In N/A 0.1% 527
Total Votes 366,444
Source: Virginia State Board of Elections "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010

On November 2, 2010, Frank Wolf won re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, defeating Jeffery R. Barnett (D), William B. Redpath (L), and a write-in.[3]

U.S. House of Representatives General Election, Virginia, Congressional District 10, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngFrank R. Wolf Incumbent 62.9% 131,116
     Democratic Jeffery R. Barnett 34.8% 72,604
     Libertarian William B. Redpath 2.2% 4,607
     Write-in Unlisted 0.1% 229
Total Votes 208,556

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 10th congressional district of Virginia after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Virginia

In 2011, the Virginia State Legislature re-drew the Congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[4] Gerald Connolly ranked 8th on the list.[4] The article notes that Connolly inadvertently benefits from a Republican plan to build up Republican incumbent districts in the redistricting process. Connolly's 11th district will lose portions of its Republican base to neighboring Frank Wolf's 10th district, resulting in a more Democratic district for Connolly.[4]. However, unless Virginia Republicans are able to win two seats in the state House, the plan will not go through and redistricting will be left up to the courts.[4]

External links

See also

References