Difference between revisions of "Virginia's 11th Congressional District"

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::''See also: [[Virginia's 11th Congressional District elections, 2012]]''
 
::''See also: [[Virginia's 11th Congressional District elections, 2012]]''
  
The 11th Congressional District of Virginia held an election for the [[U.S. House elections, 2012|U.S. House of Representatives]] on November 6, 2012. Incumbent [[Gerry Connolly]] won re-election in the district.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2012-election/results/house/virginia/ ''Politico'' "2012 Election Map, Virginia"]</ref>
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The 11th Congressional District of Virginia held an election for the [[U.S. House elections, 2012|U.S. House of Representatives]] on November 6, 2012. Incumbent [[Gerry Connolly]] won re-election in the district.<ref>[http://www.politico.com/2012-election/results/house/virginia/ ''Politico'', "2012 Election Map, Virginia"]</ref>
 
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Revision as of 21:57, 25 March 2014

Virginia's 11th Congressional District
Virginia District 11 Map.PNG
Current incumbentGerry Connolly Democratic Party
Population746,993
Gender49.5% Male, 50.5% Female
Race60.3% White, 12.34% Black, 17.6% Asian
Ethnicity17.3% Hispanic
Unemployment5.9%
Median household income$100,146
High school graduation rate92.6%
College graduation rate53.7%
Next electionNovember 4, 2014
The 11th Congressional District of Virginia is a congressional district in the commonwealth of Virginia.

Virginia's 11th Congressional District is located in the northern portion of the state and includes parts of Prince William and Fairfax counties.[1]

The current representative of the 11th Congressional District is Gerald Connolly (D).

Elections

2014

See also: Virginia's 11th Congressional District elections, 2014

The 11th Congressional District of Virginia will hold an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2014.

2012

See also: Virginia's 11th Congressional District elections, 2012

The 11th Congressional District of Virginia held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Gerry Connolly won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGerald Connolly Incumbent 61% 202,606
     Republican Chris Perkins 35.5% 117,902
     Green Joe Galdo 0.7% 2,195
     Independent Peter Marchetti 0.6% 1,919
     Independent Chris DeCarlo 0.9% 3,027
     Independent Mark Gibson 1.1% 3,806
     Write-In N/A 0.2% 788
Total Votes 332,243
Source: Virginia State Board of Elections "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Gerald Connolly won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Keith S. Fimian (R), Christopher F. DeCarlo (I), David L. Dotson (L) and David William Gillis, Jr. (G) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGerald Connolly incumbent 49.2% 111,720
     Republican Keith S. Fimian 48.8% 110,739
     Independent Christopher F. DeCarlo 0.8% 1,846
     Libertarian David L. Dotson 0.6% 1,382
     Green David William Gillis, Jr. 0.4% 959
     Unlisted Write-in 0.1% 305
Total Votes 226,951

2008
On November 4, 2008, Gerald Connolly won election to the United States House. He defeated Keith S. Fimian (R) and Joseph P. Oddo (G) in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngGerald Connolly 54.7% 196,598
     Republican Keith S. Fimian 43% 154,758
     Green Joseph P. Oddo 2% 7,271
     Unlisted Write-in 0.2% 864
Total Votes 359,491

2006
On November 7, 2006, Tom Davis won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Andrew L. Hurst (D) and Ferdinando C. Greco (Independent Green) in the general election.[5]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTom Davis incumbent 55.5% 130,468
     Democratic Andrew L. Hurst 43.6% 102,511
     Independent Green Ferdinando C. Greco 0.9% 2,042
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 259
Total Votes 235,280

2004
On November 2, 2004, Tom Davis won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Ken Longmyer (D) and Joseph P. Oddo (I) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTom Davis incumbent 60.2% 186,299
     Democratic Ken Longmyer 38.3% 118,305
     Independent Joseph P. Oddo 1.4% 4,338
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 291
Total Votes 309,233

2002
On November 5, 2002, Tom Davis won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Frank W. Creel (D) in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTom Davis incumbent 82.9% 135,379
     Democratic Frank W. Creel 16.5% 26,892
     N/A Write-in 0.6% 1,027
Total Votes 163,298

2000
On November 7, 2000, Tom Davis won re-election to the United States House. He defeated M.L. Corrigan (D), Robert K. McBride (I) and C.W. Levy (I) in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Virginia District 11 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTom Davis incumbent 61.9% 150,395
     Democratic M.L. Corrigan 34.3% 83,455
     Independent Robert K. McBridge 2% 4,774
     Independent C.W. Levy 1.7% 4,059
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 285
Total Votes 242,968

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 11th Congressional District of Virginia after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Virginia

In 2011, the Virginia State Legislature re-drew the congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

In redistricting, The Hill published a list of the Top Ten House Members who were helped by redistricting.[9] Gerald Connolly ranked 8th on the list.[9] The article notes that Connolly inadvertently benefits from a Republican plan to build up Republican incumbent districts in the redistricting process. Connolly's 11th District will lose portions of its Republican base to neighboring Frank Wolf's 10th District, resulting in a more Democratic district for Connolly.[9]. However, unless Virginia Republicans are able to win two seats in the state House, the plan will not go through and redistricting will be left up to the courts.[9]

See also

External links

References