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Virginia's 3rd Congressional District

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The 3rd Congressional District of Virginia is a congressional district in the commonwealth of Virginia.

Virginia's 3rd Congressional District is located in the eastern portion of the state and includes Charles City, colonial Heights City, Surry, Hampton City and Norfolk City counties.[1]

It previously covered all of the City of Portsmouth, parts of the Cities of Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Richmond, all of the counties of Charles City, New Kent, and Surry, and part of the counties of Henrico and Prince George.

The current representative of the 3rd congressional district is Robert C. Scott (D).

Elections

2012

See also: Virginia's 3rd congressional district elections, 2012

The 3rd congressional district of Virginia held an election for the U.S. House of Representatives on November 6, 2012. Incumbent Robert C. Scott won re-election in the district.[2]

U.S. House, Virginia District 3 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott Incumbent 81.3% 259,199
     Republican Dean Longo 18.5% 58,931
     Write-In N/A 0.3% 806
Total Votes 318,936
Source: Virginia State Board of Elections "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

2010
On November 2, 2010, Robert C. Scott won re-election to the United States House. He defeated C.L. "Chuck" Smith, Jr. (R), John D. Kelly (I) and James J. Quigley (L) in the general election.[3]

U.S. House, Virginia District 3 General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott incumbent 70% 114,754
     Republican C.L. "Chuck" Smith, Jr. 27.2% 44,553
     Independent John D. Kelly 1.2% 2,039
     Libertarian James J. Quigley 1.5% 2,383
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 171
Total Votes 163,900

2008
On November 4, 2008, Robert C. Scott won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[4]

U.S. House, Virginia District 3 General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott incumbent 97% 239,911
     N/A Write-in 3% 7,377
Total Votes 247,288

2006
On November 7, 2006, Robert C. Scott won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[5]

U.S. House District 3 General Election, 2006
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott incumbent 96.1% 133,546
     N/A Write-in 3.9% 5,448
Total Votes 138,994

2004
On November 2, 2004, Robert C. Scott won re-election to the United States House. He defeated Winsome E. Sears (R) in the general election.[6]

U.S. House, Virginia District 3 General Election, 2004
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott incumbent 69.3% 159,373
     Republican Winsome E. Sears 30.5% 70,194
     N/A Write-in 0.1% 325
Total Votes 229,892

2002
On November 5, 2002, Robert C. Scott won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[7]

U.S. House, Virginia District 3 General Election, 2002
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott incumbent 96.1% 87,521
     N/A Write-in 3.9% 3,552
Total Votes 91,073

2000
On November 7, 2000, Robert C. Scott won re-election to the United States House. He ran unopposed in the general election.[8]

U.S. House, Virginia District 3 General Election, 2000
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Democratic Green check mark transparent.pngRobert C. Scott incumbent 97.7% 137,527
     N/A Write-in 2.3% 3,226
Total Votes 140,753

Redistricting

2010-2011

This is the 3rd congressional district of Virginia after the 2001 redistricting process.
See also: Redistricting in Virginia

In 2011, the Virginia State Legislature re-drew the Congressional districts based on updated population information from the 2010 census.

External links

See also

References