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Voting in Virginia

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Information about Voting
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Poll Opening and Closing Times

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This page has information relating to voting in Virginia. For full information contact your state election agency.

Registration

Virginia uses an open primary system, meaning voters are not required to declare a party preference when registering to vote.

To vote in Virginia, you must meet the following requirements:

When and where

Voting on election day

Poll times

See also: State Poll Opening and Closing Times

In Virginia, all polls are open from 6:00 AM to 7:00 PM, Eastern Time.[1]

Absentee voting

Eligibility

You are eligible to vote absentee in an election if you cannot make it to the polls on Election Day for one of the following reasons:[2]

  • You are a "student attending college or university outside of locality of residence in Virginia"
  • You are a "spouse of student attending college or university outside locality of residence in Virginia"
  • You have "business outside County/City of residence on election day"
  • You have "personal business or vacation outside County/City of residence on election day"
  • You are "working and commuting to/from home for 11 or more hours between 6:00 AM and 7:00 PM on election day"
  • You are a "first responder (law enforcement, fire fighter, emergency technician, etc.)"
  • You have a "disability or illness"
  • You are "primarily and personally responsible for the care of a disabled/ill family member confined at home"
  • You are pregnant
  • You are "confined, awaiting trial"
  • You are "confined, convicted of misdemeanor"
  • You are an "electoral board member, registrar, officer of election, or custodian of voting equipment"
  • You "have a religious obligation"
  • You are an "Active Duty Merchant Marine or Armed Forces"
  • You are a "spouse or dependent living with" an Active Duty Merchant Marine or Armed Forces member
  • You are "temporarily residing outside U.S."
  • You are "temporarily residing outside of U.S. for employment or spouse or dependent residing with employee"
  • You are "requesting a ballot for presidential and vice-presidential electors only"
  • You are an "authorized representative of candidate or party serving inside the polling place"

Deadlines

To vote absentee by mail, the deadline to apply is 5 p.m. (EST) on the Tuesday prior to the election. To vote absentee in person, the deadline to apply is the Saturday before the election. The ballot must then be returned by close of polls on election day.[3]

Military and overseas voting

For full details regarding military and overseas voting, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program.

2013 developments

A House subcommittee rejected a bill that would have allowed citizens to vote absentee without requiring a reason for doing so. The reason stated for rejecting the bill was a lack of resources. Win Sowder of the Williamsburg registrar's office said, "This would be a real burden on our office. Our office is really small and early absentee voting would set us up for failure."[4]

However, a different bill by Delegate Daniel W. Marshall, III which would allow voters 65 and older to cast absentee ballots without an excuse was approved.[4]

Early voting

Virginia is one of fourteen states that do not allow early voting. Although it is not technically considered early voting, Virginians may submit an absentee ballot in-person, serving the same purpose as early voting.[5][6]

See also

External links

References