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Difference between revisions of "Washington Charter Schools Act, Initiative 729 (2000)"

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The [[ballot title]] question asked of voters was, "Shall school districts and public universities be authorized to sponsor charter public schools, independently operated, open to all students, and subject to revised state regulation?"
 
The [[ballot title]] question asked of voters was, "Shall school districts and public universities be authorized to sponsor charter public schools, independently operated, open to all students, and subject to revised state regulation?"
  
==Election Results==
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==Election results==
 
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{{short outcome
 
|title=Measure 729
 
|title=Measure 729

Revision as of 10:56, 12 July 2011

Ballot measures
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Washington Initiative Measure 729, also known as the Charter Schools Act, was on the November 7, 2000 election ballot in Washington as an Initiative to the People, where it was defeated.

The ballot title question asked of voters was, "Shall school districts and public universities be authorized to sponsor charter public schools, independently operated, open to all students, and subject to revised state regulation?"

Election results

Measure 729
ResultVotesPercentage
Defeatedd No1,211,39051.83%
Yes 1,125,766 48.17%

Text of the proposal

The language that appeared on the ballot:

Initiative Statute

Explanatory Statement by Attorney General: This measure would authorize the establishment of charter public schools. Each charter public school would be operated by a nonprofit corporation and sponsored by either (1) the school district where the school is located or (2) any state or regional university. The sponsoring university would approve the charter of a charter public school by action of the governing board or by an official or agency designated by the governing board. Only a school district could sponsor the conversion of a conventional public school to a charter public school.

Each charter public school would be administered by a board of directors with authority to hire employees, contract for goods and services, acquire property, and accept gifts and donations from governmental and private entities (except sectarian or religious organizations). Charter schools would not have the power of taxation or of eminent domain. Charter schools would be prohibited from charging tuition or issuing tax-backed bonds. Fees could be charged for optional noncredit extracurricular events.

Neither the charter public school sponsor nor the school district in which a charter public school is located would be liable for any of the acts or omissions of the charter public school.

A charter public school could issue secured and unsecured debt to manage cash flow, improve operations, or finance the acquisition of property and equipment. The credit of the state, of the sponsoring institution, the school district, and other political subdivisions and agencies could not be pledged for the payment of such debt.

A charter public school could operate one or more grades, kindergarten through twelve, as provided in a renewable five-year contract granted by the sponsoring district or institution. Charter public schools would be exempt from state statutes and rules applicable to public schools, except that they would be required to: comply with state and federal health, safety, and civil rights laws; participate in nationally normed standardized achievement tests; employ certificated instructional staff, with certain exceptions like apply to other public schools; comply with employee record check requirements; be subject to school district financial and audit requirements; comply with annual performance report requirements; report at least annually on progress toward meeting performance goals specified in their charters; and comply with the open public meetings act.

A charter public school would be required to enroll all students who submit a timely application, with priority for those residing in the school district where the school is located if capacity is insufficient. A charter public school could not limit admission based on race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, gender, income level, intellectual ability, disabling condition, proficiency in the English language, or athletic ability. A charter public school could limit admission to students within a given age group or grade level.

Charter applications would be made to a qualified sponsor and could be approved, renewed, modified, or revoked according to standards set forth in the measure. If the sponsor is a school district, the district would be required to provide prompt and timely funding for charter public schools on a per student basis in the amounts the schools would have received if the students were enrolled in conventional public schools in the district. Local levy moneys approved by the voters before the effective date of a charter would not be allocated to a charter public school unless the sponsoring school district determined it had authority from voters to allocate maintenance and operation excess tax levy money to the charter public school. After the effective date of a charter, charter public schools would be included in levy planning, budgets, and funding distribution in the same manner as other schools in the district.

If the sponsor is not a school district, students in a charter public school would be students of the district in which the school is located for general fund apportionment purposes, and funding for these students would be provided to the public charter school through the superintendent of public instruction. A charter public schools account would be created to receive appropriations and provide financial grants to approved charter public schools for start-up costs.

For the four years beginning on January 1, 2001, the maximum number of charters that could be granted under this measure would be 20 per year. These numbers would not include conventional public schools converting to charter schools. Until January 1, 2003, no charter school could be sponsored in a school district with a student enrollment of less than 1,000 students.

Chapter 41.56 and chapter 41.59 RCW concerning collective bargaining rights would apply to charter public schools, except that the employees of a charter public school could not be in the same bargaining units with employees of school districts or educational service districts. Charter public school employees would be eligible for membership in the same retirement systems as corresponding public school district employees, if consistent with federal law.

See also

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