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Difference between revisions of "Washington Durational Residency Requirement, SJR 143 (1974)"

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*[[1974 ballot measures]]
 
*[[1974 ballot measures]]
 
*[[List of Washington ballot measures]]
 
*[[List of Washington ballot measures]]
*[[List of ballot measures by year]]
 
*[[List of ballot measures by state]]
 
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==

Revision as of 09:53, 23 September 2013

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The Washington Durational Residency Requirement Amendment, also known as Senate Joint Resolution 143, was on the November 5, 1974 ballot in Washington as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure established a thirty-day residency requirement to vote in a state, county, or precinct election.[1] The measure amended Section 1 of Article VI of the Washington State Constitution.[2]

Election results

Washington SJR 143 (1974)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 626,827 68.28%
No291,17831.72%

Election results via: Washington Secretary of State

Text of measure

See also: Washington State Constitution, Section 1 of Article VI

The language that appeared on the ballot:[1]

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Shall a thirty-day durational residency requirement be established for voting by otherwise eligible citizens eighteen years of age or over?

Path to the ballot

On March 21, 1972, the Supreme Court of the United States in Dunn v. Blumstein ruled that durational residency requirements in excess of thirty days violated the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment of the United States Constitution.[3] Thus, the ruling invalidated Washington’s durational residency requirement. SJR 143 would have removed these ineffective provisions from the state constitution.[1]

See also

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