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Washington Tax Amendment, 2010

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Not on Ballot
Proposed allot measures that were not on a ballot
This measure did not or
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The Washington Tax Amendment, also known as I-1070, I-1073, I-1074, did not appear on the November 2, 2010 ballot in Washington as an Initiative to the People. The proposed measure would have established a tax on certain income, reduced state property tax levy, increased business tax credit.[1] According to state officials, no petitions were filed in an effort to qualify the measure for the ballot.

Text of measure

Title

The ballot title read:[1]

Statement of Subject: Initiative Measure No. 1070, No. 1073 and No. 1074 concerns taxation.
Concise Description:This measure would establish a tax on certain income, reduce the state property tax levy, reduce certain business and occupation taxes, and direct any resulting increased revenues to education and health services.
Should this measure be enacted into law? Yes [ ] No [ ]

Summary

According to the description prepared by the Washington Secretary of State:

This measure would establish a tax on “federal base income” as defined, above $400,000 for married couples filing jointly, and above $200,000 for individuals, estates, and trusts; reduce the state property tax levy by twenty percent; and increase the business and occupation tax credit to $4,800. Revenues from this measure would first replace revenues lost by virtue of the reduced levy and increased credit. Any remaining revenues would be earmarked for education and health services.

Path to the ballot

See also: Washington signature requirements

According to state officials, no petitions were filed in an effort to qualify the measure for the ballot. In order to place the proposed measure on the 2010 ballot, organizers were required to collect a minimum of 241,153 valid signatures.

See also

External links

Additional reading

References