Difference between revisions of "Washington Temporary Judges, SJR 8207 (1987)"

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*[[1987 ballot measures]]
 
*[[1987 ballot measures]]
 
*[[List of Washington ballot measures]]
 
*[[List of Washington ballot measures]]
*[[List of ballot measures by year]]
 
*[[List of ballot measures by state]]
 
  
 
==External links==
 
==External links==

Revision as of 08:54, 23 September 2013

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Articles
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Amendments

The Washington Temporary Judges, also known as Senate Joint Resolution 8207, was on the November 3, 1987 ballot in Washington as a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment, where it was approved. The measure allowed retired Superior Court judges to continue to handle pending cases in which the judge had made discretionary rulings prior to retirement.[1] The measure amended Section 7 of Article IV of the Washington Constitution.[2]

Aftermath

Section 7 of Article IV was altered again in 2001 with the enactment of Washington Temporary Superior Court Judges, SJR 8208 (2001). The measure permits superior courts to bring forth judges from lower courts to hear certain cases.

Election results

Washington SJR 8207 (1987)
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 495,273 58.84%
No346,42841.16%

Election results via: Washington Secretary of State

Text of measure

See also: Washington State Constitution, Section 7 of Article IV

The language that appeared on the ballot:[1]

Shall the constitution empower superior court judges, after retirement, to complete pending cases in which they had made discretionary rulings?[3]

Constitutional changes

The text of the amendment read:

Article IV, section 7. The judge of any superior court may hold a superior court in any county at the request of the judge of the superior court thereof, and upon the request of the governor it shall be his duty to do so. A case in the superior court may be tried by a judge, pro tempore, who must be a member of the bar, agreed upon in writing by the parties litigant, or their attorneys of record, approved by the court and sworn to try the case. However, if a previously elected judge of the superior court retires leaving a pending case in which the judge has made discretionary rulings, the judge is entitled to hear the pending case as a judge pro tempore without any written agreement.[1]

See also

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Suggest a link

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Office of the Secretary of State, "1987 Voters Pamphlet", accessed August 16, 2013
  2. Washington State Legislature, "Washington State Constitution", accessed August 19, 2013
  3. Note: This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.