Wisconsin Governor Partial Veto Authority Amendment, Question 1 (April 1990)

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 13:59, 9 June 2012 by Polycal (Talk | contribs)

Jump to: navigation, search
Voting on
State Executive
Official
StateExecLogo.png
Ballot Measures
By state
By year
Not on ballot
Wisconsin Constitution
Flag of Wisconsin.png
Preamble
Articles
IIIIIIIVVVIVIIVIIIIXXXIXIIXIIIXIV

The Wisconsin Governor Partial Veto Authority Amendment, or officially the Limiting the Governor's Partial Veto Authority question, was a legislatively-referred constitutional amendment on the April 3, 1991 ballot in Wisconsin, where it was approved.

  • This amendment modified Article V, Section 10 of the state constitution to prohibit the Governor from creating new words words in legislative bills by vetoing individual letters.[1]

Election results

Limiting the Governor's Partial Veto Authority
ResultVotesPercentage
Approveda Yes 387,068 60.52%
No252,48139.48%

Official results via: The Wisconsin Blue Book 1991-1992

Text of measure

The language that appeared on the ballot:

"Shall section 10 of article V of the constitution be revised, and shall an additional provision be created in that section, so that the governor's power to veto appropriation bills in part does not permit the creation of a new word formed by rejecting individual letters in the words of the bill passed by the legislature?"[1]

Constitutional changes

(NOTE: Scored material is added; stricken material is deleted; italics show text created.)
[Article V] Section 10 (1)(a) Every bill which shall have passed the legislature shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to the governor;if he approve, he shall sign it, but if not, he.
(b) If the governor approves and signs the bill, the bill shall become law. Appropriation bills may be approved in whole or in part by the governor, and the part approved shall become law.
(c) In approving an appropriation bill in part, the governor may not create a new word by rejecting individual leiters in the words of the enrolled bill.

(2)(a) If the governor rejects the bill, the governor shall return it the bill, together with his the objections in writing, to that the house in which it shall have the bill originated, who. The house of origin shall enter the objections at large upon the journal and proceed to reconsider it. Appropriation bills may be approved in whole or in part by the governor, and the part approved shall become law, and the part objected to shall be returned in the same manner as provided for other bills the bill. If, after such reconsideration, two-thirds of the members present shall agree to pass the bill, or the part of the bill objected to notwithstanding the objections of the governor, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of the members present it shall become a law. But in
(b) The rejected part of an appropriation bill, together with the governor's objections in writing, shall be returned to the house in which the bill originated. The /rouse of origin shall enter the objections at large upon the journal and proceed to reconsider the rejected part of the appropriation bill. If, after such reconsideration, two-thirds of the members present agree to approve the rejected part notwithstanding the objections of the governor, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of the members present the rejected part shall become law.
(c) In all such cases the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays noes, and the names of the members voting for or against passage of the bill or the rejected part of the bill objected to, notwithstanding the objections of the governor shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. If any
(3) Any bill shall not be returned by the governor within six6 days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to him, the same the governor shall be a law unless the legislature shall, by their final adjournment, prevent its prevents the bill's</s> return, in which case it shall not be a law.[1]

Path to the ballot

  • First Legislative Approval: SJR 71 & JR 76 (1987)
  • Second Legislative Approval: SJR 11 & JR 39 (1989)[2]

See also

BP-Initials-UPDATED.png
Suggest a link

External links

References