Writing:Elected or appointed executive officials

From Ballotpedia
Revision as of 15:35, 14 September 2011 by BaileyL (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
This page is a content-and-style guide about how to add the section "Elected vs. appointed" to general office articles in the State Executive Officials Project.
How to write about
state executives
Starting an article (stub)
Blank Example Article
InfoboxIntro sentence
See also section
External links and references
CategoriesTemplates
General offices:
Intro sentence • Political parties
Term limits • Vacancies
Feature - elected or appointed
OfficeholdersSee also section
External links and references
TemplatesCategories
State offices:
InfoboxIntro sentence
Current officeholderAuthority
QualificationsElectionsVacancies
DutiesDivisionsCompensation
Historical officeholders
Contact informationSee also section
External links and references
TemplatesCategories
Officials:
InfoboxIntro sentence
BiographyPolitical career
Elections (Issue positions)
Campaign contributions
See also section
External links and references
Succession boxes
TemplatesCategories
SEO news desk
The project

Elected vs. appointed

This component is subsection added to the general articles about the executive offices articles. These articles include:

Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney general, Treasurer, Controller, Auditor, Superintendent of Schools, Insurance Commissioner, Agriculture Commissioner, Natural Resources Commissioner, Labor Commissioner, Public Services Commissioner

Featured info

This section includes three main components: an explanation of which states have elected or appointed officers, a map highlighting these differences and subsections that reveal current officeholders.

Explanation:
The section should include, if information is readily available:

  • the ways in which an individual can be selected for a particular state office (normally, most states either appoint or elect their officers)
  • a list of the states that elect their officers
  • a current party breakdown of elected officers (the number of Republican and Democratic officeholders)
  • a current party breakdown of appointed officers

Map:
Included in this section should be a map of the United States that highlights which states elect or appoint the constitutional officer. Color schemes: light purple - elected; light blue - appointed.

Subsections (current officeholders):
Two subsections exist in the "Elected vs. appointed" section: "currently appointed" and "currently elected." The writing guidelines for both of those subsections can be found here.

Example

See also: Insurance Commissioner

Below is an example of a properly executed "Elected vs. appointed" section.

Elected vs. appointed

As it currently stands, there are only three ways in which an individual is able to be selected to assume the role of State Insurance Commissioner - by being publicly elected by the people of the state through the primary/general election processes, being appointed by the governor, or being appointed by a commission.

NevadaUtahColoradoNew MexicoWyomingArizonaMontanaCaliforniaOregonWashingtonIdahoTexasOklahomaKansasNebraskaSouth DakotaNorth DakotaMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaMississippiAlabamaGeorgiaFloridaSouth CarolinaIllinoisWisconsinTennesseeNorth CarolinaIndianaOhioKentuckyPennsylvaniaNew JerseyNew YorkVermontVermontNew HampshireMaineWest VirginiaVirginiaMarylandMarylandConnecticutConnecticutDelawareDelawareRhode IslandRhode IslandMassachusettsNew HampshireMichiganMichiganAlaskaHawaiiInsurance commissioners map.png

In 39 states the position is appointed. 37 of these are appointed by the Governor, with the remaining two appointed by a commission. In New Mexico the Public Regulation Commission appoints the Insurance Commissioner, while in Virginia it is decided by the State Corporation Commission. The remaining 11 states hold elections for the position.

  • Governors in 37 states are authorized to appoint individuals as Insurance Commissioners.


Subsections follow.See Writing: List of current officials (executive officials)

See also