Mark Boler

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Mark Boler
Mark BOler.jpg
Former candidate for
U.S. House, Texas, District 26
PartyLibertarian
Elections and appointments
Last electionNovember 4, 2014
Term limitsN/A
Personal
ProfessionComputer architect/scientist
Websites
Campaign website
Mark Boler was a 2014 Libertarian candidate who sought election to the U.S. House to represent the 26th Congressional District of Texas.[1] Mark Boler lost the general election on November 4, 2014.

Boler unsuccessfully sought election to the seat in 2012 as well. Boler was defeated by Republican incumbent Michael C. Burgess on November 6, 2012.[2]

Biography

Boler is a computer architect/scientist and is currently employed by a major online brokerage.[3]

Issues

Campaign themes

2014

Boler's campaign website listed the following issues:[4]

  • Constitution: "I believe that the United States Constitution, along with its amendments and the Declaration of Independence, is the law that restricts the government. It ensures that the rights of the individual are not infringed."
  • Foreign Policy: "We are the strongest nation on the planet by far and I want to keep it that way. However, I believe that when we go to war, we must do so only under a formal declaration of war by Congress."
  • Health Care: "In a true free-market system, free of government intervention and free of Crony-Capitalism, competition keeps profit margins low. At the same time, it keeps quality very high. Because if it didn't do either one of these things, customers would find a competitor that would do it better and cheaper."
  • Economy: "Servicing the debt on the monstrous deficit is draining us dry. So are a lot of other things. No one wants to do the tough things we have to do. Everyone seems to want to talk about earmarks. And getting rid of bridges to nowhere would be good. But those make up a small percentage of overall spending."
  • Civil Liberties: "I believe we can resist terrorism and protect the people of this country without giving up any of our essential liberties. The Constitution states that we have the right to be secure in our property and our persons. I believe we must limit the ability of government to collect and store data regarding our personal matters."

[5]

—Mark Boler's campaign website, http://bolerforcongress.org/issues.html

Elections

2014

See also: Texas' 26th Congressional District elections, 2014

Boler ran in the 2014 election for the U.S. House to represent Texas' 26th District. Boler won the Libertarian Party nomination at the state convention in April 2014.[6] He was defeated by incumbent Michael Burgess (R) in the general election on November 4, 2014.[7]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess Incumbent 82.7% 116,944
     Libertarian Mark Boler 17.3% 24,526
Total Votes 141,470
Source: Texas Secretary of State

2012

See also: Texas' 26th Congressional District elections, 2012

Boler ran in the 2012 election for the U.S. House to represent Texas' 26th District. He ran as a Libertarian candidate. He ran against incumbent Michael C. Burgess (R) and David Sanchez (D) in the general election on November 6, 2012.[8]

U.S. House, Texas District 26 General Election, 2012
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMichael Burgess Incumbent 68.3% 176,642
     Democratic David Sanchez 28.7% 74,237
     Libertarian Mark Boler 3% 7,844
Total Votes 258,723
Source: Texas Secretary of State "Official Election Results, 2012 General Election"

Personal

Boler and his wife, Carina, have five children.[3]

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See also

External links

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References