California Control, Regulate and Tax Marijuana Initiative (2014)

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A California Control, Regulate and Tax Marijuana Initiative was approved for circulation in California as a contender for the November 4, 2014, ballot as an initiated state statute. Two versions of the initiative (#13-0051, #13-0061) were filed and both were approved for circulation.

Its sponsors, however, dropped all efforts to get the measure on the ballot. Graham Boyd, a marijuana legalization campaign leader, said, "We see this as a trial run or a dress rehearsal for 2016."[1]

Text of measure

Version 13-0051

Ballot title:

Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.

Official summary:

"Legalizes limited amounts of marijuana, including concentrated cannabis, under state law for personal use, cultivation, possession, transportation, purchase, donation, or consumption by persons 21 years and over. Requires Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to regulate and license commercial marijuana cultivation, transportation, sales, and testing. Imposes 25% tax on nonmedical marijuana retail sales. Allocates revenues to repayment of general fund start-up loan to Department, research, afterschool programs, drug treatment and prevention, local law enforcement/fire, and environmental cleanup. Exempts medical marijuana collectives from licensing and regulatory requirements. Allows local governments to ban/limit number of marijuana businesses."

Fiscal impact statement:

(Note: The fiscal impact statement for a California ballot initiative authorized for circulation is jointly prepared by the state's Legislative Analyst and its Director of Finance.)

"Reduced costs potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional tax revenues potentially exceeding several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, a portion of which is required to be spent on after-school programs, public safety, substance abuse treatment, environmental restoration, and the regulation of commercial marijuana activities."

Version 13-0061

Ballot title:

Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.

Official summary:

"Legalizes limited amounts of marijuana, including concentrated cannabis, under state law for personal use, cultivation, possession, transportation, purchase, donation, or consumption by persons 21 years and over. Requires Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to regulate and license commercial marijuana cultivation, transportation, sales, and testing. Imposes 25% tax on nonmedical marijuana retail sales. Allocates revenues to repayment of general fund start-up loan to Department, research, afterschool programs, drug treatment and prevention, local law enforcement/fire, and environmental cleanup. Exempts medical marijuana collectives from licensing and regulatory requirements. Allows local governments to ban/limit number of marijuana businesses."

Fiscal impact statement:

(Note: The fiscal impact statement for a California ballot initiative authorized for circulation is jointly prepared by the state's Legislative Analyst and its Director of Finance.)

"Reduced costs potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional tax revenues potentially exceeding several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, a portion of which is required to be spent on after-school programs, public safety, substance abuse treatment, environmental restoration, and the regulation of commercial marijuana activities."

Support

Supporters

  • Drug Policy Alliance[2]

Path to the ballot

See also: Signature requirements for ballot measures in California
  • Sarah Behmerwohld submitted a letter requesting a title and summary for Version #13-0051 on December 5, 2013.
  • Sarah Behmerwohld submitted a letter requesting a title and summary for Version #13-0061 on December 19, 2013.
  • A title and summary for Version #13-0051 were issued by the Attorney General of California's office on January 31, 2014.
  • A title and summary for Version #13-0061 were issued by the Attorney General of California's office on February 7, 2014.
  • 504,760 valid signatures were required for qualification purposes.
  • Supporters had until June 30, 2014, to collect the required signatures for Version #13-0051.
  • Supporters had until July 7, 2014, to collect the required signatures for Version #13-0061.
  • Proponents dropped all efforts to get either measure on the ballot on February 17, 2014.

External links

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References


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