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United States Senate elections in Oklahoma, 2014

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U.S. Senate, Oklahoma General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJim Inhofe Incumbent 68% 558,166
     Democratic Matt Silverstein 28.5% 234,307
     Independent Ray Woods 1.2% 9,913
     Independent Aaron DeLozier 0.9% 7,793
     Independent Joan Farr 1.3% 10,554
Total Votes 820,733
Source: Oklahoma State Election Board



CongressLogo.png

2014 U.S. Senate Elections in Oklahoma

General Election Date
November 4, 2014

Primary Date
June 24, 2014

November 4 Election Winner:
Jim Inhofe Republican Party
Incumbent prior to election:
Jim Inhofe Republican Party
Jim Inhofe.jpg

Race Ratings
Cook Political Report: Solid Republican[1]

Sabato's Crystal Ball: Safe R[2]


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2014 U.S. House Elections

Flag of Oklahoma.png
Voters in Oklahoma elected one member to the U.S. Senate in the regular election on November 4, 2014. Oklahoma also held a special election on November 4, 2014, to fill the vacancy left by the retiring Sen. Tom Coburn (R).

Incumbent Jim Inhofe (R) defeated Democratic candidate Matt Silverstein and independent candidates Ray Woods, Aaron DeLozier and Joan Farr in the general election. He also defeated four challengers, the most he had ever faced, in the Republican primary on June 24, 2014.[3] Silverstein, an investment planner, ran unopposed in the Democratic primary. The race was correctly predicted to be a "Safe Republican" contest by Rothenberg Political Report/Roll Call.[4]

Candidate Filing Deadline Primary Election General Election
April 11, 2014
June 24, 2014
November 4, 2014

Primary: Oklahoma is one of 21 states with a mixed primary system. Parties decide who may vote, so an unaffiliated voter must be authorized by a party in order to vote in the primary.[5]

Voter registration: To vote in the primary, voters had to register by May 30, 2014. For the general election, the voter registration deadline was October 10, 2014 (25 days prior to the election).[6]

See also: Oklahoma elections, 2014

Incumbent: The election filled the Senate seat held by Jim Inhofe (R). Inhofe was first elected in 1994.

Candidates

General election candidates


June 24, 2014, primary results

Republican Party Republican Primary

Democratic Party Democratic Primary

Election results

General election

U.S. Senate, Oklahoma General Election, 2014
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJim Inhofe Incumbent 68% 558,166
     Democratic Matt Silverstein 28.5% 234,307
     Independent Ray Woods 1.2% 9,913
     Independent Aaron DeLozier 0.9% 7,793
     Independent Joan Farr 1.3% 10,554
Total Votes 820,733
Source: Oklahoma State Election Board

Primary election

Incumbent Jim Inhofe defeated D. Jean McBride-Samuels, Erick Wyatt, Evelyn Rogers and Rob Moye in the Republican primary on June 24, 2014.[3]

U.S. Senate, Oklahoma Republican Primary, 2014
Candidate Vote % Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJim Inhofe Incumbent 87.7% 231,131
Erick Wyatt 4.5% 11,950
Evelyn Rogers 4.4% 11,701
Rob Moye 1.8% 4,841
D. Jean McBride-Samuels 1.5% 3,960
Total Votes 263,583
Source: Results via Associated Press

Republican challengers

Challenger D. Jean McBride-Samuels ran against Inhofe because "He's been there too long. He should be fighting for change if (he's) going to be in Washington for almost three decades; you need to keep fighting."[9] Inhofe was 79 during the 2014 midterms. Erick Wyatt also argued that Oklahoma needed "new blood" in the Senate and ran because he did not think Inhofe was conservative enough.[9] Evelyn Rogers, who ran for the seat for a third time, said, “I want to get in there and help other people. I don’t know any other way to do than to keep running until I’m elected.”[10] Inhofe also faced Rob Moye, a retired air traffic controller, who wanted to see someone in the Senate with “better negotiating skills” than Inhofe.[10]

Key votes

Below are important votes that Inhofe cast during the 113th Congress.

Economy

Government shutdown

See also: United States budget debate, 2013

Neutral/Abstain During the shutdown in October 2013, the Senate rejected, down party lines, every House-originated bill that stripped the budget of funding for the Affordable Care Act. A deal was reached late on October 16, 2013, just hours before the debt ceiling deadline. The bill to reopen the government, H.R. 2775, lifted the $16.7 trillion debt limit and funded the government through January 15, 2014. Federal employees also received retroactive pay for the shutdown period. The only concession made by Senate Democrats was to require income verification for Obamacare subsidies.[11] The final vote on H.R. 2775 was 81-18, with all 18 votes against the bill from Republican members. Inhofe was the only senator who did not vote on the bill.[12]

No Budget, No Pay Act of 2013

Nay3.png Inhofe voted against H.R.325 -- No Budget, No Pay Act of 2013. The bill passed the Senate on January 31, 2013, with a vote of 64 - 34. The purpose of the bill was to temporarily suspend the debt ceiling and withhold the pay of members of Congress until a budget could be passed. The vote largely followed party lines with Democrats overwhelmingly supporting it and many Republicans in opposition to the bill.[13]

Immigration

Mexico-U.S. border

Neutral/Abstain Inhofe did not vote on Senate Amendment 1197 -- Requires the Completion of the Fence Along the United States-Mexico Border. The amendment was rejected by the Senate on June 18, 2013, with a vote of 39 - 54. The purpose of the amendment was to require the completion of 350 miles of fence described in the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 before registered provisional immigrant status may be granted. It would also require 700 miles of fence be completed before the status of registered provisional immigrants may be changed to permanent resident status. The vote followed party lines.[14]

Media

Jim Inhofe


Jim Inhofe: "Deeds."

Jim Inhofe: "Flight."

Endorsements

Jim Inhofe

Polls

General election
Poll Jim Inhofe Matt SilversteinOtherUndecidedMargin of ErrorSample Size
Rasmussen (dead link)
July 15-16, 2014
58%27%4%10%+/-4750
Note: The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to editor@ballotpedia.org

Campaign contributions

Candidate ballot access
Ballot Access Requirements Final.jpg

Find detailed information on ballot access requirements in all 50 states and Washington D.C.

Jim Inhofe

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Inhofe’s reports.[16]

Matt Silverstein

Candidates for Congress were required to file up to seven main reports with the Federal Election Commission during the 2014 elections season. Below are Silverstein's reports.[26]

Election history

2010

On November 2, 2010, Tom Coburn won re-election to the United States Senate. He defeated Jim Rogers (D), Stephen P. Wallace (I) and Ronald F. Dwyer (I) in the general election.[32]

U.S. Senate, Oklahoma General Election, 2010
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngTom Coburn incumbent 70.6% 718,482
     Democratic Jim Rogers 26.1% 265,814
     Independent Stephen P. Wallace 2.5% 25,048
     Independent Ronald F. Dwyer 0.8% 7,807
Total Votes 1,017,151

2008

On November 4, 2008, James M. Inhofe won re-election to the United States Senate. He defeated Andrew Rice (D) and Stephen P. Wallace (I) in the general election.[33]

U.S. Senate, Oklahoma General Election, 2008
Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJim Inhofe incumbent 56.7% 763,375
     Democrat Andrew Rice 39.2% 527,736
     Independent Stephen P. Wallace 4.1% 55,708
Total Votes 1,346,819


See also

External links

References

  1. Cook Political Report, "2014 Senate RACE RATINGS FOR August 15, 2014," accessed August 21, 2014
  2. Sabato's Crystal Ball, "2014 Senate Races," accessed August 21, 2014
  3. 3.0 3.1 Associated Press, "Oklahoma - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 24, 2014
  4. Roll Call, "2014 Election Race Ratings," accessed June 24, 2014
  5. Oklahoma State Election Board Website, "Voter Registration in Oklahoma," accessed January 3, 2014
  6. Oklahoma State Election Board Website, "Voter Registration in Oklahoma," accessed January 3, 2014
  7. 7.0 7.1 Associated Press, "Oklahoma - Summary Vote Results," accessed June 24, 2014
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 Ok.gov, "Candidates for Federal, State and Legislative Offices," accessed June 13, 2014
  9. 9.0 9.1 The State, "Oklahoma GOP Sen. Inhofe, 79, seeking 4th term," accessed June 19, 2014
  10. 10.0 10.1 Tulsa World, "Jim Inhofe a big favorite in Oklahoma's 'other' U.S. Senate race," accessed June 23, 2014
  11. The Washington Post, "Reid, McConnell propose bipartisan Senate bill to end shutdown, extend borrowing," accessed October 16, 2013
  12. Senate.gov, "H.R. 2775 As Amended," accessed October 31, 2013
  13. Project Vote Smart, "HR 325 - To Ensure the Complete and Timely Payment of the Obligations of the United States Government Until May 19, 2013 - Voting Record," accessed September 25, 2013
  14. Project Vote Smart, "S Amdt 1197 - Requires the Completion of the Fence Along the United States-Mexico Border - Voting Record," accessed September 25, 2013
  15. Politico, "FreedomWorks backs Ted Yoho, Tim Scott, Mark Sanford," accessed March 19, 2014
  16. Federal Election Commission, "Jim Inhofe Summary Report," accessed August 5, 2013
  17. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed August 5, 2013
  18. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed August 5, 2013
  19. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed October 28, 2013
  20. Federal Election Commission, "Year-End Quarterly," accessed November 3, 2014
  21. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed April 22, 2014
  22. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-Primary," accessed November 3, 2014
  23. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed November 3, 2014
  24. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed November 3, 2014
  25. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-General," accessed November 3, 2014
  26. Federal Election Commission, "Matt Silverstein Summary Report," accessed February 20, 2014
  27. Federal Election Commission, "July Quarterly," accessed February 20, 2014
  28. Federal Election Commission, "October Quarterly," accessed February 20, 2014
  29. Federal Election Commission, "Year-End Quarterly," accessed February 20, 2014
  30. Federal Election Commission, "April Quarterly," accessed April 29, 2014
  31. Federal Election Commission, "Pre-Primary," accessed June 18, 2014
  32. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 2, 2010," accessed March 28, 2013
  33. U.S. Congress House Clerk, "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2008," accessed March 28, 2013